Thrillers Book Reviews (page 46)

THE DARK HALF by Stephen King
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 23, 1989

"A potent, engrossing blend of occult and slasher horror, not as fully riveting or grandly ironic as Misery, but without the pomposities of much other recent King—It; The Tommy-knockers—and certainly slick and scary enough to make it the book to beat on the fall lists."
Book #1 (of four) of King's celebrated megabucks publishing contract—and it's King at his effusive near-best, with a long, ultra-violent, suspenseful story of a best-selling writer whose pseudonym comes to life and goes on a murderous rampage. Read full book review >
THE CARDINAL OF THE KREMLIN by Tom Clancy
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 1989

"Plenty of action; no mushy stuff."
Even as he is heavily engaged in arms negotiations and Star War technicalities, John Ryan, hero of The Hunt for Red October and Patriot Games, must come up with a plan to get the CIA's most important informer out of the hands of the KGB. Read full book review >

RED STORM RISING by Tom Clancy
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 1987

"But, still, an informative, readable, sometimes dazzling speculation on superpower war."
The author of the best-selling sub-chaser, The Hunt for Red October, launches a bigger confrontation: the USSR takes on NATO for a deadly bout of conventional warfare. Read full book review >
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 6, 1987

"Mid-brow melodrama that is a strong recovery after Buckley's recent Blackford Oakes blandishments—and far more gripping than his twitterings as bon vivant of the high seas."
Buckley's best Blackford Oakes thriller, written seemingly by a new William F. Buckley—abstemious, ambitious, inoffensive, hardworking. Read full book review >
THE GOOD TERRORIST by Doris Lessing
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 25, 1985

"Altogether, this is a book which is strong as a diagnostic study of political motivation—and stronger still as an uncannily authentic character-study."
In her first signed novel since the mythical Canopus in Argos series, Lessing returns to reality—and to her considerable gifts for social observation and vivid characterization. Read full book review >

SEE YOU LATER ALLIGATOR by William F. Buckley Jr.
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 15, 1985

"Che himself."
Who was really behind JFK's '1962 triumph in the Cuban missile crisis? Read full book review >
CHRISTINE by Stephen King
THRILLERS
Released: April 29, 1983

"King's blend of adolescent raunch, All-American sentiment, and unsubtle spookery has never, since Carrie, been more popcorn-readable—with immense appeal for all those fans interested in the 522-page equivalent of a drive-in horror movie."
The Exorcist meets My Mother, The Car. . . in a chiller that takes a nifty Twilight Zone notion and stretches it out to King-sized proportions—with teen-gab galore, horror-flick mayhem, epic foreshadowing, and endlessly teased-out suspense. Read full book review >
CUJO by Stephen King
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 1, 1981

King goes non-supernatural this time—and the result, despite the usual padding, is a tighter, more effective horror novel. Read full book review >
THE DEAN'S DECEMBER by Saul Bellow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 7, 1981

"And every page of it commands the attention."
Rich yet dry and static, Bellow's somber new book (his first as Nobel laureate) is often more essay than novel: a wintery meditation on death—a death in the family, the death of American cities, the death of the planet—as filtered through the mind of Albert Corde, one of Bellow's least vivid or particularized alter egos. Read full book review >
THE KEY TO REBECCA by Ken Follett
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 22, 1980

"Top-notch entertainment—shrewdly paced, cannily crafted."
If they liked it once, they'll love it twice. Read full book review >
EYE OF THE NEEDLE by Ken Follett
THRILLERS
Released: July 31, 1978

"As it is, Eye of the Needle introduces a fresh if not especially distinctive voice in suspense—and is easily the best first novel in the espionage genre since The Day of the Jackal."
Graham Greene he's not. Read full book review >
THE HONOURABLE SCHOOLBOY by John le Carré
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 1, 1977

"But if Le Carre is the Henry lames of spy novelists, firing more nuances than bullets, this is his Golden Bowl—dense, hard, and gleaming on the outside, clark within, and worth possessing whatever the price."
The aftermath of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy: the ascendancy of spychief George Smiley, the wholesale dismantling and piecemeal rebuilding of Britain's betrayed intelligence service, and Le Carre's longest, deepest, and quietest incisions into the gentlemen who steal secrets, hide bodies, and rarely blink. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >