Thrillers Book Reviews (page 46)

DESPERATION by Stephen King
Released: Sept. 24, 1996

"Knockout classic horror: King's most carefully crafted, well-groomed pages ever."
An astounding fall season for King unfolds with three new novels: the wind-up of his Signet paperback serial The Green Mile, and same-day dual publication of Desperation from Viking and The Regulators from Dutton (as Richard Bachman—see above). Read full book review >
RUNNING FROM THE LAW by Lisa Scottoline
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"Scottoline's hardcover debut is a keeper, with a heroine who's almost as funny as she thinks she is—which puts her miles ahead of most other lawyers you know."
Rita Morrone won't reveal her age, but she's old enough to have a pretty solid position in her Philadelphia law firm, a great poker circle, a fortyish architect lover, and a gratifyingly innocent client in a high-profile sexual harassment case. Read full book review >

Released: July 21, 1995

"Not Christ and the Grand Inquisitor, but a vastly daring change of pace for the atheist Lestat, a tormented Ivan Karamazov tied into spiritual knots and left disbelieving his own senses."
The fifth volume in the Vampire Lestat chronicles (The Tale of the Body Thief, etc.) finds Lestat pitted against the greatest adversaries of his bloody life: God and the Devil. Read full book review >
INSOMNIA by Stephen King
Released: Oct. 17, 1994

"Still, at 800 pages, it ain't no coffee-table book — it's a coffee table."
A small town in Maine again serves as King's (Nightmares and Dreamscapes, 1993, etc.) setting in this deft, steady tale, in which two lovable geezers travel through hyper-reality to balance the books of human existence, or something to that effect. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 7, 1992

"5 million first printing); but Dolores is a brilliantly realized character, and her struggles will hook readers inexorably."
As Jessie Burlingame lies handcuffed to her bed in Gerald's Game (p. 487), she recalls how, on the clay 30 years ago that her dad molested her, she had a vision of a woman—a murderer?—at a well King explains that vision here: Dolores Claiborne is the woman, and her story of how she killed her husband, and the consequences, proves a seductively suspenseful, if quieter, complement to Jessie's shriek-lest of a tale. Read full book review >

LOST BOYS by Orson Scott Card
Released: Nov. 7, 1992

"Affecting, genuine, poignant, uplifting: a limpid, beautifully orchestrated new venture from an author already accomplished in other fields."
First mainstream outing—a family drama with a touch of the supernatural—from the leading fantasist (the Alvin Maker series) and sf writer (The Memory of Earth, p. 81). Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 31, 1992

"Irresistible as Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin's All of Me."
Rice fans awaiting the finale of 1990's The Witching Hour will be only temporarily dismayed by the author's fourth bloodletting and the return of the Vampire Lestat—in what is Rice's most strongly plotted novel yet. Read full book review >
GERALD'S GAME by Stephen King
Released: July 13, 1992

"This one is really scary."
King takes it over the top, way over the top, in an exquisitely horrifying frightfest about a woman forced to face her deepest fears—and then some. Read full book review >
Released: March 4, 1992

"Should outsell The Firm."
Gripping legal suspenser by the author of last year's hallucinatory The Firm—and an even stronger performance than that still-current bestseller. Read full book review >
HARLOT'S GHOST by Norman Mailer
Released: Oct. 15, 1991

The Big One, volume one (yes, 1,408 pages!) of Mailer's long-promised masterpiece, in which he does for the CIA what Melville did for mammals and God, and what Thomas Mann did for the metaphysics of tuberculosis. Read full book review >
NEEDFUL THINGS by Stephen King
Released: Sept. 30, 1991

"Leland King's glee, or Steven Gaunt's, or rather—well, the author's—as he rubs his palms over his let's-blow-'em-away superclimax is wonderfully catching."
The old horrormaster in top form, this time with a demonic dealer in magic and spells selling his wares to the folks of Castle Rock, scene of several King novels including The Dead Zone, Cujo—and how many others? Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 3, 1991

"5 million."
A double-double Whopper hot from the grill of "America's literary boogeyman," as he puts it in his introduction: four sizzling horror novellas sandwiched within the theme of "Time. . .and the corrosive effects it can have on the human heart." Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Elin Hilderbrand
October 13, 2015

In Winter Stroll, a sequel to last year's holiday novel Winter Street, Elin Hilderbrand improves on the first by delving deeper into the emotional lives of the Quinn clan. Christmas on Nantucket finds Winter Street Inn owner Kelley Quinn and his family busily preparing for the holiday season. Though the year has brought tragedy, the Quinns have much to celebrate: Kelley has reunited with his first wife Margaret, Kevin and Isabelle have a new baby; and Ava is finally dating a nice guy. But when Kelley's estranged wife Mitzi shows up on the island, along with Kevin's devious ex-wife Norah and a dangerously irresistible old fling of Ava's, the Inn is suddenly overrun with romantic feuds, not to mention guests. “Although some of the Quinns' problems are resolved, many are not, happily promising a third installment next year,” our reviewer writes. View video >