Thrillers Book Reviews (page 46)

THE PELICAN BRIEF by John Grisham
THRILLERS
Released: March 4, 1992

"Should outsell The Firm."
Gripping legal suspenser by the author of last year's hallucinatory The Firm—and an even stronger performance than that still-current bestseller. Read full book review >
HARLOT'S GHOST by Norman Mailer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 1991

The Big One, volume one (yes, 1,408 pages!) of Mailer's long-promised masterpiece, in which he does for the CIA what Melville did for mammals and God, and what Thomas Mann did for the metaphysics of tuberculosis. Read full book review >

NEEDFUL THINGS by Stephen King
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 30, 1991

"Leland King's glee, or Steven Gaunt's, or rather—well, the author's—as he rubs his palms over his let's-blow-'em-away superclimax is wonderfully catching."
The old horrormaster in top form, this time with a demonic dealer in magic and spells selling his wares to the folks of Castle Rock, scene of several King novels including The Dead Zone, Cujo—and how many others? Read full book review >
FOUR PAST MIDNIGHT by Stephen King
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 3, 1991

"5 million."
A double-double Whopper hot from the grill of "America's literary boogeyman," as he puts it in his introduction: four sizzling horror novellas sandwiched within the theme of "Time. . .and the corrosive effects it can have on the human heart." Read full book review >
THE SUM OF ALL FEARS by Tom Clancy
THRILLERS
Released: Aug. 14, 1991

"This is quite a rouser."
The master of the techno-thriller places nuclear-weapon technology in the hands of Third World terrorists and sets the superpowers on the path to Armageddon just when everybody thought it was safe to relax. Read full book review >

THE FIRM by John Grisham
THRILLERS
Released: March 15, 1991

"Hallucinatory entertainment."
Terrifically exciting and likable first novel about tax lawyers and the Mafia, and a predictable success already sold to the movies, etc. Grisham does not cut as deep or furnish the occasional shining paragraph that Scott Turow does, but he writes a stripped, cliche-free page that grips and propels. Read full book review >
JURASSIC PARK by Michael Crichton
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 7, 1990

"A sure-fire best-seller."
Genetically engineered dinosaurs run amok in Crichton's new, vastly entertaining science thriller. Read full book review >
CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER by Tom Clancy
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 1990

The Great Clancy Thriller Machine rumbles on, engines on full. Read full book review >
TUCKER'S LAST STAND by William F. Buckley Jr.
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 12, 1990

"Sensible spying, with buffoonish Lyndon Johnson for comic relief."
Following a clear, hard-edged recovery in Mongoose, R.I.P. (1987), Buckley keeps up the pace in his literate Blackford Oakes spy series. Read full book review >
THE DARK HALF by Stephen King
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 23, 1989

"A potent, engrossing blend of occult and slasher horror, not as fully riveting or grandly ironic as Misery, but without the pomposities of much other recent King—It; The Tommy-knockers—and certainly slick and scary enough to make it the book to beat on the fall lists."
Book #1 (of four) of King's celebrated megabucks publishing contract—and it's King at his effusive near-best, with a long, ultra-violent, suspenseful story of a best-selling writer whose pseudonym comes to life and goes on a murderous rampage. Read full book review >
THE CARDINAL OF THE KREMLIN by Tom Clancy
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 1989

"Plenty of action; no mushy stuff."
Even as he is heavily engaged in arms negotiations and Star War technicalities, John Ryan, hero of The Hunt for Red October and Patriot Games, must come up with a plan to get the CIA's most important informer out of the hands of the KGB. Read full book review >
RED STORM RISING by Tom Clancy
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 1987

"But, still, an informative, readable, sometimes dazzling speculation on superpower war."
The author of the best-selling sub-chaser, The Hunt for Red October, launches a bigger confrontation: the USSR takes on NATO for a deadly bout of conventional warfare. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kate Beaton
July 21, 2015

Kate Beaton is the author/illustrator of the No. 1 New York Times bestseller Hark! A Vagrant! Now she is also a picture book author and illustrator with the recent release of The Princess and the Pony. Princess Pinecone knows exactly what she wants for her birthday this year. A big horse. A strong horse. A horse fit for a warrior princess! But when the day arrives, she doesn't quite get the horse of her dreams. “Where else can readers find hipster warriors, anime influences, perfectly placed fart jokes, a hidden ugly-sweater contest, and a skirmish packed with delightful nonsense (llamas! knights! hot dogs! turtle costumes!)—and have it all make such wonderful sense?” writes our reviewer in a starred review. “Instead of breaking bones, this warrior princess breaks the mold—and Beaton is in a class of her own.” View video >