Thrillers Book Reviews (page 46)

THE SUM OF ALL FEARS by Tom Clancy
THRILLERS
Released: Aug. 14, 1991

"This is quite a rouser."
The master of the techno-thriller places nuclear-weapon technology in the hands of Third World terrorists and sets the superpowers on the path to Armageddon just when everybody thought it was safe to relax. Read full book review >
THE FIRM by John Grisham
THRILLERS
Released: March 15, 1991

"Hallucinatory entertainment."
Terrifically exciting and likable first novel about tax lawyers and the Mafia, and a predictable success already sold to the movies, etc. Grisham does not cut as deep or furnish the occasional shining paragraph that Scott Turow does, but he writes a stripped, cliche-free page that grips and propels. Read full book review >

JURASSIC PARK by Michael Crichton
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Nov. 7, 1990

"A sure-fire best-seller."
Genetically engineered dinosaurs run amok in Crichton's new, vastly entertaining science thriller. Read full book review >
CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER by Tom Clancy
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 1990

The Great Clancy Thriller Machine rumbles on, engines on full. Read full book review >
TUCKER'S LAST STAND by William F. Buckley Jr.
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 12, 1990

"Sensible spying, with buffoonish Lyndon Johnson for comic relief."
Following a clear, hard-edged recovery in Mongoose, R.I.P. (1987), Buckley keeps up the pace in his literate Blackford Oakes spy series. Read full book review >

THE DARK HALF by Stephen King
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 23, 1989

"A potent, engrossing blend of occult and slasher horror, not as fully riveting or grandly ironic as Misery, but without the pomposities of much other recent King—It; The Tommy-knockers—and certainly slick and scary enough to make it the book to beat on the fall lists."
Book #1 (of four) of King's celebrated megabucks publishing contract—and it's King at his effusive near-best, with a long, ultra-violent, suspenseful story of a best-selling writer whose pseudonym comes to life and goes on a murderous rampage. Read full book review >
THE CARDINAL OF THE KREMLIN by Tom Clancy
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 1989

"Plenty of action; no mushy stuff."
Even as he is heavily engaged in arms negotiations and Star War technicalities, John Ryan, hero of The Hunt for Red October and Patriot Games, must come up with a plan to get the CIA's most important informer out of the hands of the KGB. Read full book review >
RED STORM RISING by Tom Clancy
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 1987

"But, still, an informative, readable, sometimes dazzling speculation on superpower war."
The author of the best-selling sub-chaser, The Hunt for Red October, launches a bigger confrontation: the USSR takes on NATO for a deadly bout of conventional warfare. Read full book review >
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 6, 1987

"Mid-brow melodrama that is a strong recovery after Buckley's recent Blackford Oakes blandishments—and far more gripping than his twitterings as bon vivant of the high seas."
Buckley's best Blackford Oakes thriller, written seemingly by a new William F. Buckley—abstemious, ambitious, inoffensive, hardworking. Read full book review >
THE GOOD TERRORIST by Doris Lessing
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 25, 1985

"Altogether, this is a book which is strong as a diagnostic study of political motivation—and stronger still as an uncannily authentic character-study."
In her first signed novel since the mythical Canopus in Argos series, Lessing returns to reality—and to her considerable gifts for social observation and vivid characterization. Read full book review >
SEE YOU LATER ALLIGATOR by William F. Buckley Jr.
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 15, 1985

"Che himself."
Who was really behind JFK's '1962 triumph in the Cuban missile crisis? Read full book review >
CHRISTINE by Stephen King
THRILLERS
Released: April 29, 1983

"King's blend of adolescent raunch, All-American sentiment, and unsubtle spookery has never, since Carrie, been more popcorn-readable—with immense appeal for all those fans interested in the 522-page equivalent of a drive-in horror movie."
The Exorcist meets My Mother, The Car. . . in a chiller that takes a nifty Twilight Zone notion and stretches it out to King-sized proportions—with teen-gab galore, horror-flick mayhem, epic foreshadowing, and endlessly teased-out suspense. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >