Thrillers Book Reviews (page 46)

MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

Taylor completes his unique reverse trilogy, which began in 1995 with The Four Last Things (1997) and traveled back to 1970 with The Judgment of Strangers (1998), in this deceptively quiet cathedral mystery, set in 1957-58, which packs wronged wife Wendy Appleyard to the Dark Hostelry in Rosington, where she licks her wounds at the home of her best friend, Janet Byfield, whose husband David, vice principal at the local theological college, is sedately angling to replace the retiring principal. Read full book review >
THE COLOR OF SUMMER by Reinaldo Arenas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2000

"Excessive, redundant, chaotic, and absolutely necessary. And if Fifo ever gets hold of a copy, he'll be swallowing his cigars."
Fourth volume of the late (1943-90) Cuban writer's semiautobiographical "pentagony" (Arenas's word), written in 1991 as part of a five-volume sequence (The Palace of White Skunks, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >

AFTER LIFE by Rhian Ellis
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 2000

"Impressively assured and insightful."
First-novelist Ellis makes an auspicious debut with this imaginatively rendered psychological suspense thriller set in an upstate New York town inhabited entirely by mediums and spiritualists. Read full book review >
RAVELING by Peter Moore Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2000

"Stylish, substantive, and savvy."
A classy suspense debut pitting two men against each other in that struggle between brothers that's as old as the Bible. Read full book review >
A CONVENTIONAL CORPSE by Joan Hess
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: July 1, 2000

"First-rate Hess: crackling dialogue, winning characters, and an ingenious puzzle."
Perennially put-upon bookseller Claire Malloy (A Holly, Jolly Murder, 1999, etc.) is marching to an assertive new beat these days. Read full book review >

SNAKE by Mary Woronov
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"If David Lynch wants a new script, send him this chunk of lost highway."
A first-rate suspense thriller by actress/director Woronov (Swimming Underground: My Years in the Warhol Factory, 1995), who has appeared in over 20 films, including Paul Bartel's surreal Eating Raoul and Warhol's Chelsea Girls. Read full book review >
FLASH POINT by James W. Huston
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 2000

"A thinking man's military thriller, with superb action, crackling hardware-speak, and just enough tragedy to emphasize the emotional price for so much gung-ho American heroism."
Huston's third military thriller is also his best as it examines the cost of another hypothetical American reprisal against terrorism, this time with a supersonic fighter-jet pursuit of a bin Laden stand-in to his secret desert fortress. Read full book review >
THE NOTORIOUS DR. AUGUST by Christopher Bram
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

A deeply felt novel about the "crimes" of love that ultimately brings fresh meaning to that tired phrase "family values." Read full book review >
THE NIGHT BUS by Janice Law
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"A superior performance, inarguably the author's best to date."
We first meet Cath Tolland as an anonymous passenger on the night bus to Florida, traveling in a deep personal fog that eventually lands her in a hospital emergency room. Read full book review >
HEARTS IN ATLANTIS by Stephen King
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 14, 1999

"His masterpiece."
King's fat new work impressively follows his general literary upgrading begun with Bag of Bones (1998) and settles readers onto the seabottom of one of his most satisfying ideas ever. Read full book review >
WHEN THE WIND BLOWS by James Patterson
THRILLERS
Released: Nov. 4, 1998

"Reads like a dream."
This time out, Patterson (Jack and Jill, 1996, etc.) summons some brio and does a magic hat trick with the million-dollar—promo thriller genre. Read full book review >
DAMASCUS GATE by Robert Stone
THRILLERS
Released: May 14, 1998

"Not to be missed."
Stone's inordinately ambitious sixth novel, which in several surface ways resembles his A Flag for Sunrise (1981), grapples with intractable issues of political and religious faith, compromise, and betrayal. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >