Thrillers Book Reviews (page 483)

CLEOPATRA'S NEEDLE by Steven Siebert
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1999

"Egyptology, what a can of worms."
A suspense/romance based on Egyptology by screenwriter/first-novelist Siebert. Read full book review >
RESURRECTION DAY by Brendan Dubois
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1999

"DuBois's version of life after limited nuclear war has some clever constructs, but turgid pacing and threadbare characterization reduce a promising what-if to so-so."
The speculative setting for DuBois's latest (after Shattered Shell, p. 106, etc.) is the world after the Cuban missile crisis got resolved the hard way. Read full book review >

THE SERPENT CLUB by Tom Coffey
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1999

"Tersely detailed violence, a made-for-Hollywood car chase, courtroom histrionics, and villains too bad to be true: the nastiest L.A. noir since Robert Campbell's La-La Land series."
A first novel about a burned-out Los Angeles reporter's edgy obsession with rough sex, depraved teenagers, and a murdered 13-year-old girl, from a New York Times sports editor. Read full book review >
A GOD IN RUINS by Leon Uris
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1999

"Uris himself offers a rather woozy moral message bordering on bombast in a novel that may widen his audience and boost sales, but hardly matches the author's messianic ambitions."
Uris takes on a subject bigger than the Irish (Trinity, 1976, and Redemption, 1995), the Jews (Exodus, 1958, and Mitla Pass, 1988), or the Arabs (The Haj, 1984). Read full book review >
SOUNDING DRUM by Larry Jay Martin
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1999

"A double-zero."
An awkwardly plotted cautionary tale that speculates, unsuccessfully, about what Native Americans, scheming businessmen, and Sicilian mobsters might do if a document turned up that gave a valuable patch of Manhattan real estate back to the Indians. Read full book review >

THE BREAKER by Minette Walters
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1999

"Once again, Walters (The Echo, 1997, etc.) breathes new life into the classic whodunit by treating the cast as agonized—and this time monstrously immature—human beings. (Book-of-the-Month main selection)"
When the binoculars that young Paul and Daniel Spender have snitched from their father first give them a glimpse of the body of Kate Hill-Sumner in Chapman's Pool, off the Isle of Purbeck, three other people are also close by: a self-styled actor whose specialty is gay pornography; a horse-boarder whose swindler husband has run off with all her money; and a teenaged girl aboard an offshore boat idly looking for something to videotape. Read full book review >
THE TURNING OF THE TIDE by Reginald Hill
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1999

"The excitement of Emily Salter's attempts to escape the attention of her monomaniacal ex-husband Sterne Follett is still palpable; it just isn't new."
A truth-in-packaging commendation is due Hill's publisher for identifying this thriller as a reprint originally published in 1971 as The Castle of the Demon under Hill's pseudonym Patrick Ruell. Read full book review >
NIGHTSHADE by Robert Phillips
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1999

"For such, this is a useful collection; but aficionados may find they already own nearly half of its contents."
This successor to Phillips's successful 1989 collection, The Triumph of the Night, likewise fulfills critic Edmund Wilson's prescription for an anthology offering "stories by really first-rate modern writers" that favor psychological nuance over Gothic paraphernalia. Read full book review >
THE RIGHT HAND OF EVIL by John Saul
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1999

"Willing suspension of disbelief is one thing, but asking a reader to go along with immeasurably overfamiliar storytelling effects is another. (Literary Guild/Doubleday Main Selection)"
Saul's twentysomethingth horror novel begins with vacuous overwriting that improves only slightly as he settles into a banality far less fresh than his better stuff (The Presence, 1997; Shadows,1992, etc.). Read full book review >
THE REDHUNTER by William F. Buckley Jr.
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1999

"Brisk, engrossing, vintage Buckley (Brothers No More, 1995, etc.). Given that it's a tale unabashedly partisan, it is - for the most part - surprisingly credible. (Author tour)"
A fictional portrait of Joe McCarthy - sympathetic but not sanitized - in which clay feet replace cloven hooves. Read full book review >
HADRIAN'S WALLS by Robert Draper
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 17, 1999

"A breezy encounter with human darkness, carried on by the lilt of Draper's choice prose. (First printing of 60,000)"
In his cool, prosaically loping fiction debut, Texas journalist Draper easily entraps the reader in a Lone Star State prison town rancid with lies, corruptions, and cover-ups. Read full book review >
A CINDERELLA AFFIDAVIT by Michael Fredrickson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 17, 1999

"The dialogue is literate, often funny—and all the characters live and breathe. (75,000 first printing)"
A legal thriller so savvy and so well-written it's hard to believe it's a first novel. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >