Thrillers Book Reviews (page 483)

THE MARTYRING by Thomas Sullivan
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: March 1, 1998

"Sullivan's most sustained and strongest yet, with the plus of being well stocked with stained-glass lore."
From the author of The Phases of Harry Moon (1988) and the stylish Born Burning (1989): a densely written and conceived suspense novel that's too earnest and too rich for a simple pursuit of the genre's standard gore and horror. Read full book review >
IRON SHADOWS by Steven Barnes
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 1, 1998

"A solid, hard-hitting workout, well-pitched and balanced, with plenty of broad appeal."
Another contemporary horror/fantasy that, like Blood Brothers (1996), features the same mysterious immortal sorcerer known as the African. Read full book review >

DELIRIUM by Douglas Cooper
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 24, 1998

"A further descent into the maelstrom, or some promise of recovery?"
The desire of architecture to impose order, and the repercussions of artistic ``overreaching,'' are given dramatic and often cryptic symbolic expression in this unusual second novel (``the first-ever to be serialized on the Web'') from the Canadian- born Cooper, who's a comic-surrealist crossbreed of the late Lawrence Durrell and William S. Burroughs. Read full book review >
APPLAUD THE HOLLOW GHOST by David J. Walker
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 19, 1998

"Mal's third (Half the Truth, 1996, etc.) does a manful job of tacking between fisticuffs and sensitive stuff, though violence will win out, in an operatic finale, before all the perps are finally brought to book."
BRINGING OUT THE DEAD by Joe Connelly
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 16, 1998

"Don't expect a strong sense of plot or direction from this zany, painfully sensitive debut—just think of it as a nightmare to endure along with Frank until you're released by the last page. (First printing of 50,000)"
Connelly's first novel presents two hellish, interminable, and presumably normal days and nights in the life of an EMS paramedic. Read full book review >

AN ISOLATED INCIDENT by Susan R. Sloan
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 10, 1998

"Still, the thrills come one a minute, and they chill to the bone."
Following the success of her first thriller (Guilt by Association, 1995), Sloan returns with an excursive police procedural set in a racially divided northwestern town—a tale that, however imperfect the narrative, yields intoxicating suspense. Read full book review >
BITCH FACTOR by Chris Rogers
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 10, 1998

"Rogers's debut is a generous two-course meal, even though Dixie's adventures on the road and her stint as a detective seem to belong in two separate novels."
The Christmas recess hits Houston just before a jury can find rolling-stone salesman Parker Dann guilty of the hit-and-run killing of 11-year-old Betsy Keyes, and Dann's attorney, Belle Richards, is convinced that Dann's taken advantage of the break to go on a holiday of his own. Read full book review >
DIGITAL FORTRESS by Dan Brown
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 10, 1998

A technothriller, less improbable than some, involving computers, cryptography, and government paranoia. Read full book review >
FOG HEART by Thomas Tessier
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 9, 1998

"Strong dialogue and a refusal to rely on bizarre occurrences to move the story along lend distinction to what might otherwise be a run-of-the-morgue horror novel."
Easily Tessier's best novel yet (Secret Strangers, 1993, etc.), a restrained account of a girl/woman with a wild talent for seeing into the beyond. Read full book review >
HIGH CRIMES by Joseph Finder
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 4, 1998

"Tri-Star should blow A Few Good Men right off the map. (Film rights to Tri-Star; author tour)"
Turning from international intrigue (The Zero Hour, 1996, etc.) to courtroom drama—think A Few Good Men starring a wife defending her husband—Finder spins his tightest web yet. Read full book review >
DEADLOCK by Malcolm C. MacPherson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"A flashy opening gives way to a routine, albeit tangled, legal yarn that's redeemed by a quirky cast and a wide-eyed fascination with courtroom chicanery."
MacPherson (In Cahoots, 1994, etc.) offers a lively, if gimmicky, San Franciscobased legal procedural that leavens the requisite sleazy sensationalism with a Dickensian delight in oddball characters, class warfare, and courtroom arcana. Read full book review >
THE LAST HOSTAGE by John J. Nance
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 1998

"Many slam-bang special effects, and the characters are unremarkable, but Nance's streamlined narrative offers some nicely nasty twists right up to a startling, and grimly appropriate, climax."
Strongly knotted, twisty airline melodrama from Nance (Medusa's Child, 1997, etc.), an air safety analyst and retired Air Force pilot who served in Vietnam and Desert Storm, still serves as a Boeing 737 captain for a major airline, and is a licensed attorney. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >