Thrillers Book Reviews (page 483)

BURNING GIRL by Ben Neihart
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1999

A transgressive thriller from the author of Hey, Joe (1996), describing the troubles of a young man from the wrong side of the tracks who's taken up by rich friends and given a brutal introduction to life in the fast lane. Read full book review >
WAITING by Frank M. Robinson
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 1999

"Robinson's gloomy prognosis for the destruction of every ecosystem sustaining Homo sapiens seems all too plausible."
A thriller about the distant past and terrifying future, set in a vividly drawn San Francisco, from the author of The Dark Beyond the Stars (1991), etc. When a physician, Larry Shea, is killed by feral dogs, his friend Arthur Banks suspects foul play: Shea had been on route to give a speech to Banks's club, a group of intellectuals who have met periodically since the 1960s. Read full book review >

BLACK LIGHT by Elizabeth Hand
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 1, 1999

"Vivid, evocative, and well informed if heavily symbolic, with accurately limned teenaged characters; the problem's not so much a slender plot that doesn't cohere as the failure of the characters to adopt any recognizably purposeful course of action."
In Hand's new fantasy, as in Waking the Moon (1995), two opposing groups of magicians, the Benandanti and the Malandanti, struggle to control human destiny. Read full book review >
THE PILLARS OF SOLOMON by Jon Land
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 22, 1999

"But Land (Dead Simple, 1998, etc.), like so many other authors of big fat thrillers, is flummoxed by the problems of the middle, which sags and drags."
Star-crossed superheroes in a standard suspenser set in the Middle East. Read full book review >
THUNDER ON THE MOUNTAIN by David Poyer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 1999

"If Poyer hasn't exactly rewritten The Grapes of Wrath, he has given us a rousing good read, and one that ought to make a nifty miniseries."
Richly entertaining melodrama about the US labor movement, reminiscent of both early Steinbeck and John Sayles's Union Dues, from the prolific author of popular naval adventures (such as The Circle, 1992) and sociopolitical thrillers (e.g., The Only Thing to Fear, 1995). Read full book review >

THE TRIALS OF NIKKI HILL by Christopher Darden
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 1999

"Trials' is right."
O.J. Simpson assistant prosecutor Darden teams up with suspense writer Lochte (The Neon Smile, 1995, etc.) for this earnest, shapeless tale of—what else?—a stand-up deputy D.A. fighting for truth and justice in the jungles of Los Angeles. Read full book review >
A SIGHT FOR SORE EYES by Ruth Rendell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 17, 1999

"If the result lacks the energy and inevitability of the classic A Judgment in Stone, Rendell supplies a Dickensian wealth of social detail that brings her beautiful people and their predators to startling life."
Rendell's 46th (Road Rage, 1997, etc.) is a modern-day fairy tale—Margaret Yorke meets Fay Weldon—that shows the dark side of lovers' reckless pursuit of their objects of beauty. Read full book review >
ABIDE WITH ME by E. Lynn Harris
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 16, 1999

"More of the same from an unadventurous conception."
The lives of five thirtyish African-Americans are updated in this final installment of a trilogy (Invisible Life, 1992; Just As I Am, 1994) that doesn—t stray from the soap-opera conventions that also govern the first two. Read full book review >
MISTAKEN IDENTITY by Lisa Scottoline
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 12, 1999

"But even the most skeptical fans will be impressed at how tightly Scottoline knots them all together in her biggest book yet."
Continuing her run of coming up with the best hooks in the legal intrigue trade (Rough Justice, 1997, etc.), Scottoline tosses Philadelphia lawyer Bennie Rosato her most challenging client—an accused cop-killer who claims she's Bennie's identical twin. Read full book review >
THE MARCHING SEASON by Daniel Silva
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 10, 1999

"What survives is a sure hand with the larger picture, some movie-tense action sequences, a hero worth rooting for—and a few lucky members of the supporting cast. (Book-of-the-Month selection; author tour)"
The Troubles claim still another victim, as Silva's attempt to pull off the hat trick falls short of the success of his two earlier spy thrillers. Read full book review >
MOSAIC by John R. Maxim
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 9, 1999

"This capable veteran has done better (Haven, 1997, etc.)."
A hodgepodge of a thriller about secret government experiments aimed at turning Multiple Personality Disorder into a positive. Read full book review >
MORTAL JUDGMENT by John A. Peak
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 9, 1999

"Peak's best so far (Blood Relations, 1997, etc.), thanks to an engrossing and vivid cast, particularly the brainy, flinty, flirty, ever-honest Vicki, who in spite of her frailties (or probably because of them) is quintessentially lovable."
A woman dies under the surgeon's knife, and nobody is sure why. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >