Thrillers Book Reviews (page 483)

Z by Bob Mayer
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

Although retired from the US Army, Dave Riley is not out of the action as he battles crafty villains and a deadly pestilence in southwestern Africa in this sixth installment of Mayer's absorbing and well-written series (Cut-Out, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >
THE CLUB DUMAS by Arturo Pérez-Reverte
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"Bibliophiles will love this witty and clever fabrication, though its very specialized content may place it just outside the range of the general reader."
An intricate and very bookish mystery novel—set, in fact, in the rarefied world of book collecting and dealing—from the sophisticated Spanish author of The Flanders Panel (1994, not reviewed). Read full book review >

THE DEVIL'S FOOTPRINT by Victor O'Reilly
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 29, 1997

"Although O'Reilly includes a rather full measure of preachments on the West's indifference to the latter-day threat of terrorism, he tells a mean adventure story—chock-full of high-tech power and chivalric glory."
Irish hardcase Hugo Fitzduane goes another resourceful round with the Japanese terrorists he fought to a bloody standstill in Rules of the Hunt (1995). Read full book review >
TRICK QUESTION by Tony Dunbar
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 27, 1997

"Fans of jocular Tubby (City of Beads, 1995, etc.), though, will drink up the convivial New Orleans atmosphere, and the spectacle of a lawyer whose co-counsel declines to examine a witness because his doctor's ordered him to avoid conflict."
Some people are always ready to jump to conclusions. Read full book review >
THE FRIENDS OF FREELAND by Brad Leithauser
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 24, 1997

"Skillfully crafted and conceived, but far too long and obvious."
A Northern Saga, longer than an Arctic shadow and tougher to swallow than frozen venison filet, from a gifted poet and novelist (Seaward, 1993, etc.) who seems to have had a lot of time on his hands. Read full book review >

CLASS TRIP by Emmanuel Carrère
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 13, 1997

Class Trip ($19.95; Jan. 13, 1997; 176 pp.; 0-8050-4694-1): A subtle combination of noir mystery and metaphysical thriller by the acclaimed author of The Mustache (1988) and Gothic Romance (1990). Read full book review >
FLESH AND BONES by Paul Levine
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Jake just never learns about women—luckily for his fans, who'll find this impossible case, his seventh (Fool Me Twice, 1995, etc.), more tightly wound than any since his debut in To Speak for the Dead (1990)."
Not even a lawyer as light on his feet as Jake Lassiter can find much wiggle room when he himself was one of the dozens of witnesses who watched his client, model Chrissy Bernhardt, walk up to her father in a crowded bar and shoot him three times, sending him spiraling into a fatal heart attack. Read full book review >
IN THE DEEP MIDWINTER by Robert Clark
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Still, his ability to see the value in a lost, often ridiculed, way of life is valuable, as is his tidy narrative technique. (First printing of 50,000; $75,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
A first novel by the biographer of James Beard tries to recapture the moral issues of 1950s America, a time when WASPish reticence and conservative social values reigned. Read full book review >
BAG MEN by John Flood
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Gorgeously and audaciously plotted, with a trio of starring roles that would make a casting director salivate, even if he weren't being tested for drugs."
The beating death of a Catholic priest on a Logan Airport runway on New Year's Eve is only the beginning of this gritty first novel's magical mystery tour of 1965 Boston. Read full book review >
THE UNLIKELY SPY by Daniel Silva
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"A fine, twisty tale of military intelligence, notable for graceful prose, credibly motivated characters, and evocative detail. (First printing of 150,000; Book-of-the-Month Club alternate selection; $150,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Television producer Silva delivers a fine, old-fashioned WW II debut thriller that pits an English don against Admiral Wilhelm Canaris's Abwehr—in a deadly contest of wits on the eve of the Allied invasion of occupied Europe. Read full book review >
THE DANCER UPSTAIRS by Nicholas Shakespeare
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Precisely, beautifully detailed, with a remarkable grasp of tension in a society not the writer's own: a tale both faithful to its time and utterly timeless."
In a sequel of sorts to his award-winning novel The Vision of Elena Silves (1990), Shakespeare again explores an explosive situation in Latin America (inspired by the Shining Path insurrection in Peru), deftly mingling love and suspense in a powerful, persuasive narrative. Read full book review >
THE MAMMOTH BOOK OF BEST NEW HORROR 7 by Stephen Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"If you think all horror is hackwork, try this."
The best single horror collection of the year features 26 pieces of short fiction by top writers, as well as a superb review of the year's output in horror writing in the English-speaking world by editor Jones. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >