Thrillers Book Reviews (page 490)

GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN by Phillip Margolin
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 4, 1993

A rash of grisly torture/murders of upscale Portland, Oregon, housewives—each kidnapped by someone who leaves behind a black rose and a note saying ``Gone, but not forgotten''—turns out to have unholy roots in an identical series of killings across the country a decade earlier. Read full book review >
MRS. POLLIFAX AND THE SECOND THIEF by Dorothy Gilman
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Oct. 3, 1993

"Pollifax fans may love it, but Gilman's best work lies outside this series."
Grandmother, garden-clubber, karate expert, and part-time CIA agent Emily Pollifax (Mrs. Pollifax and the Whirling Dervish, 1990, etc.) is sent by boss Carstairs first to a funeral in Virginia, then to Sicily. Read full book review >

THE FIRE THEFT by Mark  Graham
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A rousing beginning degenerates into a long and not very exciting series of well-timed and eventually predictable coincidences amidst some attractive scenery."
Drugs, politics, a bit of sex, and a lot of archaeology provide the international thrills in an international thriller by the author of The Missing Sixth (1992), etc. Crossing the English Channel on a clapped-out ferry, mysterious pilot and international femme fatale Jaymin Bartel is witness to highly suspicious behavior on the part of a Middle Eastern passenger. Read full book review >
WOLF WHISTLE by Lewis Nordan
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"The result is a high-wire act—of surprising tenderness—that can only enhance Nordan's reputation."
Following Bebe Moore Campbell's Your Blues Ain't Like Mine (1992), here's another (and far superior) first novel based on the 1955 Mississippi lynching of the teenager Emmett Till. Read full book review >
INTEREST OF JUSTICE by Nancy Taylor Rosenberg
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Any writer who will pit a cripple against a maniac is a commercial force to be reckoned with—expect big interest in this smartly melodramatic crowd-pleaser. (Literary Guild Dual Selection for December; film rights to Citadel/HBO)"
High-gear legal-action thriller about a judge caught up in a child-porn scam gone rotten. Read full book review >

ZERO COUPON by Paul Erdman
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A capital rogues-to-riches entertainment—with precious little sex or violence but a wealth of inside information on fiscal chicanery."
Erdman (The Swiss Account, The Palace, etc.) makes a welcome return to form with a blue-chip tale of high finance and low cunning in the post-Milken era. Read full book review >
KISS THEM GOOD-BYE by Joseph Eastburn
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Sept. 23, 1993

"But maybe you'll like the trimmings—a clown disguise, eviscerations, hints of incest, and the full panoply of sideshow horrors."
Rookie Buffalo police Lt. Read full book review >
THE LIST OF 7 by Mark Frost
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 17, 1993

"821, it far outclasses)—but a jolly good adventure yarn for that. (Film rights to Universal)"
History has it that Arthur Conan Doyle based Sherlock Holmes on his med-school teacher Dr. Joseph Bell. Read full book review >
SILENT DESCENT by Dick Couch
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 15, 1993

"Lots of pep and some nifty new gadgets, including a stealthy non-nuclear sub."
A cash-strapped Russian general decides to meet his payroll by selling nukes to fractious Third World nations—while American SEALs travel to the Arctic to clamp down on the rather dangerous free market. Read full book review >
SACRED CLOWNS by Tony Hillerman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 15, 1993

Navajo Detective Jim Chee, working now for Lt. Read full book review >
CREATED BY by Richard Christian Matheson
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 15, 1993

"Still, an unusually clever horror novel."
Horrific satire of Hollywood-based network TV, with the satire more biting than the horror. Read full book review >
RUFFIANS by Tim Green
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 14, 1993

"Dime-novel characters, gloppy dialogue, and sex-by-the-numbers make for a drab outing—zero yards gained, zero points scored."
Pro player Green, an Atlanta Falcons defensive stalwart, fades back to take a pass at writing a football novel and is sacked. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fatima Bhutto
April 14, 2015

Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, Fatima Bhutto’s debut novel The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan’s Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border. Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined. Our reviewer writes that The Shadow of the Crescent Moon is “a timely, earnest portrait of a family torn apart by the machinations of other people’s war games and desperately trying to survive.” View video >