Thrillers Book Reviews (page 490)

KILLINGS by A.W. Gray
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 5, 1993

"Shove over, Elmore Leonard."
White-haired, wild-eyed defender Bino Phillips (Bino, 1988) has pinned his hopes of getting coked-up football player Mickey Stanley acquitted of serious dealing on two witnesses—but one of them is dead, her body half drained of blood, and now the other has gone missing. Read full book review >
GUARDIAN by John Saul
THRILLERS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Bound for bestsellerdom—like many of Saul's others."
Saul's 16th horror novel (Shadows, 1992, etc. etc.) finds the author in a less horrific, even speakable mode, since the pivotal plot device seems possible, if definitely unlikely. Read full book review >

THE LAST AERIE by Brian Lumley
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Lumley's High Purple storytelling delirium remains undimmed."
Second novel in Lumley's Vampire World series (Blood Brothers, 1992), or subseries, but apparently seventh in the overall Necroscope series, each volume a doorstopper. Read full book review >
WAR BREAKER by Jim DeFelice
THRILLERS
Released: July 20, 1993

"There's some silly business about divine apparitions and amorous telepathy, but it's atoned for by the fresh new scenery."
A bankrupt ex-CIA agent takes his helicopter flying skills to the Indian subcontinent—where Muslim monarchists, Sikh separatists, and megalomaniac militarists are at daggers drawn. Read full book review >
CLOUDBURST by Ryne Douglas Pearson
THRILLERS
Released: July 16, 1993

"Newcomer Pearson ranges about smartly indeed with mind- boggling expertise."
Hyperreal whiz-bang first novel by a gifted high-tech specialist. Read full book review >

THE BRITANNIA CONTRACT by Paul Mann
THRILLERS
Released: July 15, 1993

"Grand summer reading—an outsized, perfectly realized thriller that doesn't carry any of Clancy's extra weight. (First printing of 50,000)"
Mann's bid at a Clancy-sized thriller has an elegantly simple premise. Read full book review >
PRIME WITNESS by Steve Martini
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: July 14, 1993

"Good medium-grade beach fare."
Defense attorney Paul Madriani (Compelling Evidence, 1992) signs on for a brief stint in the Davenport, California, prosecutor's office—then finds himself condemned to try a high-profile serial killing. Read full book review >
THE NIGHT MANAGER by John le Carré
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: July 7, 1993

"Despite the familiarity of the story's outlines, le Carre shows his customary mastery in the details—from Jonathan's self-lacerating momentum to the intricacies of interagency turf wars—and reveals once again why nobody writes espionage fiction with his kind of authority."
Le Carre returns to the same subject as his disappointingly episodic The Secret Pilgrim—the fate of espionage in the new world order—but now looks forward instead of backward, showing a not-quite innocent mangled between that new order and the old one, whose course le Carre has so peerlessly chronicled for 30 years. Read full book review >
THE BOOK OF COMMON DREAD by Brent Monahan
THRILLERS
Released: July 7, 1993

"Enrapting!"
A vampire at Princeton! Read full book review >
THE FAT BOY MURDERS by David A. Kaufelt
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: July 1, 1993

"A cluttered suburban cozy—first of a new series by Kaufelt (Souvenir, 1983, etc.)—for fans of David Willis McCullough's Ziza Todd stories."
Years ago, the Fat Boys—a not-so-secret society in a Waggs Neck Harbor (Long Island) Catholic high school—asserted their masculinity by tormenting sensitive Jackson Hall. Read full book review >
DESERT FIRE by David Hagberg
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 1993

"An absorbing if wintry tale—especially notable for its broody atmosphere and its driven, world-weary protagonist."
A lone German detective battles Iraqis and PLO mercenaries seeking to secure Saddam Hussein a powerful atomic reactor that would guarantee him bomb-grade plutonium—in an effectively moody chiller from old pro Hagberg (Critical Mass, etc.). Read full book review >
HONOR AMONG THIEVES by Jeffrey Archer
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 1993

"Maps of the Washington motorcade route and the Mideast—just in case you have any questions. (First printing of 500,000)"
It's Amateur Night on the international intrigue stage, as perennial bestseller Archer (As the Crow Flies, etc.) shows Saddam Hussein's henchmen grooming an actor to take the place of the President so that they can—push the button that starts WW III? Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >