Thrillers Book Reviews (page 490)

SUSPICION OF DECEIT by Barbara Parker
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 2, 1998

"Even Parker's fans might put this one down."
Messy, overplotted third volume in Parker's Suspicion series (Suspicion of Guilt, 1995, etc.) continues the travails of Miami lawyer Gail Connor. Read full book review >
THE PERFECT WITNESS by Barry Siegel
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Not a whodunit, but a sharp, unsparing exploration of the conflicts between justice and advocacy in the adversarial system Greg's inherited from the Founding Fathers."
A dogged defense attorney's running battle with an unimpeachable prosecution witness raises disturbing questions about the nature of the judicial process, in this first novel by crime reporter Siegel (Shades of Gray, 1992, etc.). Read full book review >

THE HOUSE GUN by Nadine Gordimer
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"A Dostoyevskian look at crime and punishment, although a far remove from the way the earlier master did it."
A passionately schematic moral anatomy of a murder. Read full book review >
OVER THE LINE by Faye Sultan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Realistically rough in the early going, then, but hampered by a fatal lack of invention."
A forensic psychologist struggles to prove that the killer of two old women was insane, in a fact-based case courtesy of Kennedy (Welcome to the End of the World: Prophecy, Rage and the New Age, p. 854, etc.) and first-novelist Sultan. Read full book review >
SHELTER FROM THE STORM by Tony Dunbar
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Disaster Lite, with just enough nefarious plotting to punch up the drolly understated tableaux till you can't help laughing, and just enough menace to make you feel you aren't really missing anything by picking Tubby over the special-effects spectaculars at the local flick."
Nothing in the recent climactic southeast hurricanes of Edna Buchanan or Julie Smith will have prepared you for Dunbar's uniquely laid-back approach to natural disaster. Read full book review >

ONE MUST WAIT by Penny Mickelbury
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"The juicy Louisiana conspiracy is too big and evil and unexpected to yield as easily as it does to C.A.'s questions, even when those questions are put by an investigator with the most powerful motive in the world."
Mickelbury (Night Songs, 1995, not reviewed) kicks off a new series starring Carole Ann Gibson, a black D.C. lawyer who's got it all—a loving lawyer husband, a bungling bank account, a stack of pro bono acquittals (like her latest, a defense of accused cop/bagman Tommy Griffin)—and no job. Read full book review >
MAXIMUM LIGHT by Nancy Kress
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Dubious characters, plotting that relies on coincidence, and a threadbare backdrop: disappointing work from this talented yet erratic writer."
More near/medium-future biological manipulations from the author of Beggars Ride (1996), etc. By 2034, endocrine-disrupting chemical pollutants have caused a collapse in world fertility. Read full book review >
SKULL SESSION by Daniel Hecht
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"An earnestly wrought, meandering tale that, despite some gripping scenes and lots of facts about neurophysiology, adds up to less than the sum of its parts. (Author tour)"
An ambitious but torpidly paced pass at a creepy-house horror tale that tries to combine Stephen Kingish gore-on-the-floor gross-outs with Dean Koontzical monster mash. Read full book review >
ANOTHER DAY IN PARADISE by Eddie Little
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"The stages of addiction have seldom been so vividly drawn. (Film rights to Miramax; author tour)"
A gutsy, fresh, and fierce drug novel, something like walking over broken glass barefoot, by first-novelist and former addict Little. Read full book review >
THE CONSUL'S WIFE by W.T. Tyler
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Thick with bilious resentment and impotent rage: a trenchant, eloquently crafted drama of lost souls who find salvation where they least expect it."
Powerfully despairing, Graham Greenelike tale of romance and alienation in the blasted African bush, from our foremost chronicler of Washington's faceless bureaucracy and the lives it so blithely consumes (Last Train from Berlin, 1994, etc.). Read full book review >
BAD CHEMISTRY by Gary Krist
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"For most of the ride, though, it's strictly efficient formula suspense."
A model husband's disappearance plunges his never-say-die wife into agitation, mystery, danger, designer-drug intrigue, and trouble with the local cops. Read full book review >
REAPER by Ben Mezrich
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 1, 1998

"Wait for the (inevitable) movie. ($300,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Mezrich's second technothriller (after Threshold, 1996) charts the progress of two All-American Perfect Specimens in their race against the clock to stop a rogue communications virus from wiping out most of the TV-watching and computer-literate population. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >