Thrillers Book Reviews (page 490)

VIOLIN by Anne Rice
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 31, 1997

"Of the gilded pen that single-handedly revived the vampire genre much can be forgiven, but this soul-mush is worse than Marie Corelli's, who molded such lavender vapors into novels a century ago (The Sorrows of Satan, etc.) and is now well-forgotten."
Anne Rice in her short form, and yet dreadfully in need of a caustic edit. Read full book review >
CAPITOL VENTURE by Barbara Mikulski
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Oct. 30, 1997

"A few set pieces on congressional hearings and other aspects of partisan politics aside: another exercise in capital—that is, Beltway—punishment."
Despite a notably unpromising debut (Capitol Offense, 1996), US Senator Mikulski carries on with a series that pits a fictive counterpart against homicidal freebooters in and out of Washington. Read full book review >

STATE OF EMERGENCY by Steve Pieczenik
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 27, 1997

"Their disinclination to stop chatting and get on with the harder jobs at hand, though, leaves both their insurrection and counterattack DOA."
Pieczenik (Pax Pacifica, 1995, etc.) offers a sluggish, unforgivably talky near-future tale in which four western governors with more guts than brains lock horns with a federal government whose increasingly autocratic actions have driven even law-abiding citizens into the arms of secessionists. Read full book review >
THE WIND-UP BIRD CHRONICLE by Haruki Murakami
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 26, 1997

"On a canvas stretched from Manchuria to Malta, and with sound effects from strange birdcalls to sleigh bells in cyberspace, this is a fully mature, engrossing tale of individual and national destinies entwined. It will be hard to surpass."
Not merely a big book from the broadly respected Murakami (Dance Dance Dance, 1994, etc.), but a major work bringing signature themes of alienation, dislocation, and nameless fears through the saga of a gentle man forced to trade the familiar for the utterly unknown. Read full book review >
THE VELOCITY OF MONEY by Stephen Rhodes
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 19, 1997

"A blue-chip debut thriller that brings new resonance to the old saw of getting killed in the market."
An inquisitive young lawyer is all that threatens the success of a plot to precipitate a capital-markets meltdown that will yield its villainous instigators a megabuck return: an impressive first novel by the pseudonymous Rhodes. Read full book review >

THE PIED PIPER OF DEATH by Richard Forrest
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Oct. 17, 1997

"Neatly plotted, with a particularly deft use of the Piper family curse and the most surprising visit to a family tomb in years."
Munitions king Peyton Piper is used to being in control. Read full book review >
THE THIRD LION by Floyd Kemske
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 15, 1997

"An offbeat account of a world-class rogue from yesteryear, whose ingratiating civility and utter lack of scruples helped him leave large footprints on the sands of time."
Kemske, best known for his quirky takes on latter-day organization men (Human Resources, 1995, etc.), smoothly shifts gears to deliver a wryly engrossing historical novel featuring the duplicitous French statesman Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand- PÇrigord. Read full book review >
TORCHLIGHT by III Stevenson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 13, 1997

"The gripping undersea sequences offset the farfetched intrigues inside the Beltway, if only just barely."
A pair of ex-SEALs take on turncoats in the upper echelons of the US government, as well as a host of villainous foreigners, to bring an international arms trafficker to book: a diverting sea story from first-novelist Stevenson (whose forebears include the venturesome author of Treasure Island). Read full book review >
SHADOWS by Jonathan Nasaw
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 13, 1997

"Not as original as The World on Blood, but swift-moving, with fitfully interesting characters."
Nasaw, who invented the San Francisco's Vampires Anonymous group for The World on Blood (1996), brings Jamey Whistler, his most presentable and epicurean vampire, back from that novel, this time plunging him into greater peril. Read full book review >
THE KINGDOM OF SHIVAS IRONS by Michael Murphy
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 6, 1997

"These are the occult dimensions of golf, straight from the Easter bunny. ($200,000 ad/promo; author tour)"
Ghosts on the golf course! Read full book review >
THE DEFENSE by D.W. Buffa
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Cool courtroom high jinks mired in forced plotting, clumsy dialogue, and the author's clear loathing of the legal trade. (First printing of 100,000; author tour)"
Ham-fisted, corpse-clogged legal procedural from defense- lawyer/first-novelist Buffa. Read full book review >
ANGRY MOON by Terrill Lee Lankford
THRILLERS
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"He wouldn't have been far off if he had."
Lankford follows the nihilistic noir Shooters (1996) with a shrieking, hellacious Quentin Tarantino knockoff: dueling assassins, one of whom is immortal. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Kendare Blake
November 16, 2016

Bestseller Kendare Blake’s latest novel, Three Dark Crowns, a dark and inventive fantasy about three sisters who must fight to the death to become queen. In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. The last queen standing gets the crown. “Gorgeous and bloody, tender and violent, elegant, precise, and passionate; above all, completely addicting,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >