Thrillers Book Reviews (page 491)

ALL FOR LOVE by Pat Booth
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 8, 1993

"The blithe mix of theology, barhopping, and orgasms may be too much even for Booth's fans, a fairly tough lot."
Gushy chronicler of the demimonde Booth, whose Miami (1992) was a steamer about the modeling biz in that steamiest of cities, stays in Florida for a near-pornographic peep at psychiatry and New Age religion. Read full book review >
A SIMPLE PLAN by Scott Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 7, 1993

"Think of a backwater James M. Cain, or a contemporary midwestern Unforgiven—and don't think about getting any sleep tonight. (First printing of 75,000; film rights...?)"
A fairy-tale windfall blasts the lives of two brothers, determined to do whatever it takes to hold onto the money, in Scott's electrifying first novel. Read full book review >

THE WOLVES OF SAVERNAKE by Edward Marston
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 6, 1993

"Marston fans may hope for his early return to that other world he so brilliantly re-created."
The author moves from his customary Elizabethan Age theater world (The Mad Courtesan, etc.) to 1086 and the village of Bedwyn, dominated by its Abbey, its Royal Mint, and the Savernake Forest surrounding it. Read full book review >
NICHOLAS COOKE by Stephanie Cowell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Seething and turbulent: Cowell's debut is a moving picaresque- -as well as a detailed portrait of Shakespearean England—and a delight to read."
The splendor and squalor of Elizabethan England come sharply into focus in this saga of a talented, troubled actor's search for himself: a first from Renaissance specialist Cowell. Read full book review >
NIGHTMARE, WITH ANGEL by Stephen Gallagher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"As in disaster movies, whatever may happen to the good guys, the bad guys are sure to be punished in this swift- moving, professional midbrow pulp."
British TV writer Gallagher makes his US debut in this neo-gothic tale of an unhappy girl who's neglected by her often absent father, who's bent on returning to her highly unsuitable mother—and who runs away from home in the company of a child killer. Read full book review >

POWERS OF ATTORNEY by Mimi Lavenda Latt
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Despite its title, this isn't much of a courtroom drama, or much of a detective story—but if you can't decide whether to pack a mystery, a legal triple-decker, an Ecstasy romance, or a soap opera, it'll take up less room than the four of them together."
Finally, a distaff legal thriller—attorney Latt's debut—in which the male bodies are as lovingly described as the female: three law-school classmates duke it out, in and (mostly) out of court, over the murder of fabulousy wealthy James D'Arcy. Read full book review >
NO OTHER LIFE by Brian Moore
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Moore's gift (Lies of Silence, 1990, etc.) for framing volatile political and religious questions in terms of particular human experience has never been taken to such extraordinary lengths as in this brief, ambitious, deeply unsettling novel."
A Catholic priest presents the parable of the rise and fall (or is it an apotheosis?) of a charismatic statesman and holy man—an ambiguous contemporary messiah—on a poor, deeply troubled West Indian island. Read full book review >
THE WRONG MAN by David E. Fisher
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Follett crowd."
Fisher is a Bo Jackson of writing, an author whose yen to excel in two literary arenas—thrillers (Hostage One, 1989, etc.) and popular science (Across the Top of the World, 1992, etc.) seems to spread his talent a bit thin. Read full book review >
SMILLA'S SENSE OF SNOW by Peter Høeg
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"But her combination of brisk misanthropy and shrewd commentary on the colonial exploitation of Greenland—yes, this is a postcolonial novel about the Arctic—could score big. (First printing of 40,000)"
Danish novelist Heg's first English-language publication is an attempt to freeze out Gorky Park by moving from an intimate mystery to an ever-widening circle of corruption and danger—and to even colder climes. Read full book review >
7 STEPS TO MIDNIGHT by Richard Matheson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

A legend of horror returns to the field after 15 years—and stumbles. Read full book review >
THE LIES THAT BIND by Judith Van Gieson
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

Albuquerque damn-the-establishment, marginally solvent lawyer Neil Hamel (The Wolf Path, etc.) finds herself defending aging, vodka-and-Halcion-addicted Martha Conover—the strait-laced, racist mother of her former school chum Cindy—on charges that she intentionally ran over and killed young Argentine ÇmigrÇ Justine Virga on Halloween. Read full book review >
VIRAVAX by Bill Ransom
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Still, fans of the Herbert-Ransom books will certainly want to investigate."
Near-future thriller about genetic engineering, from an author best known for his science-fiction collaborations with the late Frank Herbert (The Ascension Factor, 1988, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Luis Alberto Urrea
April 21, 2015

Examining the borders between one nation and another, between one person and another, Luis Alberto Urrea’s latest story collection, The Water Museum, reveals his mastery of the short form. This collection includes the Edgar-award winning "Amapola" and his now-classic "Bid Farewell to Her Many Horses," which had the honor of being chosen for NPR's "Selected Shorts" not once but twice. Urrea has also recently published a poetry collection, Tijuana Book of the Dead, mixing lyricism and colloquial voices, mysticism and the daily grind. We talk to Urrea about both of his new books this week on Kirkus TV. View video >