Thrillers Book Reviews (page 491)

JUSTICE FOR SOME by Kate Wilhelm
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 8, 1993

"Fluent and accomplished, but altogether more routine than Death Qualified (1991), veteran fantasist Wilhelm's truly unusual last excursion into detection."
The morning after Judge Sarah Drexler arrives at her elderly father's place in East Shasta, Oregon, the old man, a water gardener, is pulled out of one of his own fountains; and a week later, news comes that a Fran Donatio, a private detective he'd hired, was killed on the road back home. Read full book review >
GOERING'S LIST by J.C. Pollock
THRILLERS
Released: June 3, 1993

A tough-as-nails Delta Force vet who freelances for the CIA teams up with a Mossad lovely to hunt down a ruthless terrorist known only as Dieter in a twisty, to-the-ends-of-the-earth technothriller from Pollock (Threat Case, 1991; Payback, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >

SOUTHERN DISCOMFORT by Margaret Maron
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 1, 1993

"Less edgy than last year's strong debut for Deborah, but, like it, awash with southern kinfolk, pesky neighbors, North Carolina down-home-isms, and a sturdy if slowly paced plot."
Colleton County district lawyer Deborah Knott (Bootlegger's Daughter, 1992), elevated to district judge when Perry Byrd keels over and dies, returns to the house she's helping the WomenAid project build—and discovers her niece Annie Sue, half-concussed and with her panties pulled down, plus the hammered-to-death body of sexy building-inspector Carver Bannerman. Read full book review >
PLAYING WITH COBRAS by Craig Thomas
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 1993

"Enjoy, enjoy."
Unlike his retired master Sir Kenneth Aubrey (A Hooded Crow, 1991), bullheaded Patrick Hyde isn't allowed to go gentle into that good night: Aubrey's replacement, Peter Shelley, talks him into going to India to look into Hyde's old mate Philip Cass's story that he didn't kill his mistress, film star Sereena Sharmar, wife of the minister of tourism. Read full book review >
THE RED HORSEMAN by Stephen Coonts
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 1993

"Chalk up another red, white, and blue ace for the author and his jet- jockeys."
Rear Admiral Jake Grafton, aviator-hero of Coonts's Under Siege (1990), etc., now saves the world from potential Armageddon- -and gets to meet Boris Yeltsin and Saddam Hussein in the bargain. Read full book review >

WINTER IN THE HEART by David Poyer
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 1993

"Unremittingly bleak."
On leave from his skillful and successful military thrillers (The Med, The Gulf, The Circle), Poyer takes his readers to a ravaged corner of Pennsylvania where eco-despair, alcohol, and ruthless business practices make life miserable for everyone. Read full book review >
BLUE HEARTS by Jim Lehrer
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 1993

"Lehrer floats like a butterfly, but this time he doesn't sting like a bee."
Versatile TV journalist/memoirist/satirist Lehrer (Short List, 1992, etc.) adds espionage to his resumé with this likable extended anecdote about two old CIA grads who accidentally stir up a mess of Kennedy-assassination trouble 30 years after the fact. Read full book review >
PLEADING GUILTY by Scott Turow
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 1, 1993

"But his legions of fans surely won't miss the chance to see Turow as they've never seen him before."
Instead of cranking out clones of Presumed Innocent, Turow has preferred to take chances—first with The Burden of Proof, which dispensed with his whodunit plot, and now, even more radically, with a foulmouthed, alcoholic lawyer's account of his search for one of his missing partners—and the $5.6 million that vanished with him. Read full book review >
STRANGE THINGS AND STRANGER PLACES by Ramsey Campbell
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 1993

"With so much Campbell to read or reread, only die-hard fans will want to bother with these scrappy leavings."
A middle-drawer miscellany—eight stories and two novellas- -that spans the 20-year career of British horror-writer Campbell. Read full book review >
NEVER SEND FLOWERS by John E. Gardner
THRILLERS
Released: May 31, 1993

"As Gardner struggles to update the perils his superstar hero faces, Bond himself remains the biggest anachronism of all."
Like Pentagon dinosaurs laboring to adapt to a new world order by finding telltale traces of the old in every dark shadow, Gardner's reincarnation of James Bond examines a string of serial killings and finds a freelance terrorist just as dangerous as his old adversaries from SMERSH and SPECTRE. Read full book review >
CROSSING BY NIGHT by David Aaron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 21, 1993

"Aaron's best yet."
Grand espionage-adventure at the dawn of WW II, with the lovely wrinkle that the spy is a woman: American-born Elizabeth Pack, whose real-life exploits on behalf of the British take on stirring fictional form courtesy of Aaron (Agent of Influence, 1988, etc.) Read full book review >
KALEIDOSCOPE EYES by Graham Watkins
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: May 14, 1993

"Worth a try, though it might be wise to call it quits after the hot chili peppers."
Sadomasochistic shivers about an incarnate Aztec goddess and the spell she casts over six North Carolina yuppies. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Bill Browder
author of RED NOTICE
March 24, 2015

Bill Browder’s Red Notice is a nonfiction political thriller about an American financier in the Wild East of Russia, the murder of his principled young tax attorney, and his mission to expose the Kremlin’s corruption. In 2007, a group of Russian law enforcement officers raided Browder’s offices in Moscow and stole $230 million of taxes that his fund’s companies had paid to the Russian government. Browder’s attorney Sergei Magnitsky investigated the incident and uncovered a sprawling criminal enterprise. A month after Sergei testified against the officials involved, he was arrested and thrown into pre-trial detention, where he was tortured for a year. On November 16, 2009, he was led to an isolation chamber, handcuffed to a bedrail, and beaten to death by eight guards in full riot gear. “It may be that ‘Russian stories never have happy endings,’ ” our reviewer writes about Red Notice, “but Browder’s account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin’s thugocracy.” View video >