Thrillers Book Reviews (page 495)

SMILLA'S SENSE OF SNOW by Peter Høeg
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"But her combination of brisk misanthropy and shrewd commentary on the colonial exploitation of Greenland—yes, this is a postcolonial novel about the Arctic—could score big. (First printing of 40,000)"
Danish novelist Heg's first English-language publication is an attempt to freeze out Gorky Park by moving from an intimate mystery to an ever-widening circle of corruption and danger—and to even colder climes. Read full book review >
7 STEPS TO MIDNIGHT by Richard Matheson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

A legend of horror returns to the field after 15 years—and stumbles. Read full book review >

THE LIES THAT BIND by Judith Van Gieson
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

Albuquerque damn-the-establishment, marginally solvent lawyer Neil Hamel (The Wolf Path, etc.) finds herself defending aging, vodka-and-Halcion-addicted Martha Conover—the strait-laced, racist mother of her former school chum Cindy—on charges that she intentionally ran over and killed young Argentine ÇmigrÇ Justine Virga on Halloween. Read full book review >
VIRAVAX by Bill Ransom
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Still, fans of the Herbert-Ransom books will certainly want to investigate."
Near-future thriller about genetic engineering, from an author best known for his science-fiction collaborations with the late Frank Herbert (The Ascension Factor, 1988, etc.). Read full book review >
ELECT MR. ROBINSON FOR A BETTER WORLD by Donald Antrim
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"But Antrim's failure to orchestrate his flashy set-pieces leaves the impression of a first draft, albeit from a promising new talent with a wonderfully keen ear. (First serial to Harper's and The Paris Review.)"
Civilization's thin crust tears again. Read full book review >

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Stories that mostly manage to be otherworldly and strange without turning into horror fiction or mere trots."
A first collection of 11 short stories, many with a Rod Serling-like twist, together with an introduction by Spencer (Maybe I'll Call Anna, 199) that laments the present-tense minimalist state of the literary short story. ``The Return of Count Electric'' is about a narrator who searches in his father's house for a death machine, thinking his father is a serial murderer; instead, he discovers that he himself is the murderer and, once he remembers, begins again his career of crime. ``The Wedding Photographer in Crisis'' concerns a Bill Murray kind of guy who forces a groom to go through with the wedding and films the bride topless. Read full book review >
THE YEAR'S BEST FANTASY AND HORROR by Ellen Datlow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 27, 1993

"Add on the various summations (Fantasy, Horror, TV and movies, obituaries, Honorable Mentions) and the result is another generous, appealing anthology, with much fine work and something to please all tastes."
Another colossal compendium, comprising 48 stories (although the late Angela Carter's ``Alice in Prague, or the Curious Room'' is included but not listed) and five poems (though two poems by Margaret Atwood are listed but not included). Read full book review >
THE LOST KEATS by Terence Faherty
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 19, 1993

"Less metaphysical intrigue than in last year's Live to Regret, but still this reflects Owen's attempts to reconcile his feelings with his actions—and it's told with the self-deprecating humor of Deadstick."
In August 1973, Owen Keane (in this prequel to Deadstick, 1991) is AR—At-Risk of dropping out—of a southern Indiana seminary when his spiritual advisor, Father Jerome, suggests that he look into the disappearance of his classmate Michael Crosley, who simply up and left the premises two weeks back. Read full book review >
SUMMER COOL by Al Sarrantonio
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 16, 1993

"Sleep well, America."
When her husband Bobby, a Yonkers cop, goes out for ice cream one hot night and never comes back—pausing in his flight only long enough to make an abusive 4 a.m. phone call and clean out their bank accounts—Terry Petty calls Bobby's old friend and former colleague, stargazing shamus Jack Paine (who debuted in Cold Night, 1989). Read full book review >
DREAMING IN COLOR by Charlotte Vale Allen
THRILLERS
Released: Aug. 15, 1993

"Topical and, oddly, commercially comfy."
Veteran novelist Allen (Leftover Dreams, 1992, etc.) now offers an ultimately feel-good tale about the successful rehabilitation of a severely battered woman who, with her child, is aided by three generations of women. Read full book review >
KILLINGS by A.W. Gray
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 5, 1993

"Shove over, Elmore Leonard."
White-haired, wild-eyed defender Bino Phillips (Bino, 1988) has pinned his hopes of getting coked-up football player Mickey Stanley acquitted of serious dealing on two witnesses—but one of them is dead, her body half drained of blood, and now the other has gone missing. Read full book review >
GUARDIAN by John Saul
THRILLERS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Bound for bestsellerdom—like many of Saul's others."
Saul's 16th horror novel (Shadows, 1992, etc. etc.) finds the author in a less horrific, even speakable mode, since the pivotal plot device seems possible, if definitely unlikely. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jodi Picoult and Samantha van Leer
authors of OFF THE PAGE
May 19, 2015

Meet Oliver, a prince literally taken from the pages of a fairy tale and transported into the real world. Meet Delilah, the girl who wished Oliver into being. In bestseller Jodi Picoult and her daughter Samantha van Leer’s new young adult novel, Off the Page, it’s a miracle that seems perfect at first—but there are complications. To exist in Delilah’s world, Oliver must take the place of a regular boy. Enter Edgar, who agrees to play Oliver’s role in the pages of Delilah’s favorite book. But just when it seems that the plan will work, everything gets turned upside down. We talk to the mother-daughter team on Kirkus TV. View video >