Thrillers Book Reviews (page 495)

THE RED HORSEMAN by Stephen Coonts
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 1993

"Chalk up another red, white, and blue ace for the author and his jet- jockeys."
Rear Admiral Jake Grafton, aviator-hero of Coonts's Under Siege (1990), etc., now saves the world from potential Armageddon- -and gets to meet Boris Yeltsin and Saddam Hussein in the bargain. Read full book review >
WINTER IN THE HEART by David Poyer
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 1993

"Unremittingly bleak."
On leave from his skillful and successful military thrillers (The Med, The Gulf, The Circle), Poyer takes his readers to a ravaged corner of Pennsylvania where eco-despair, alcohol, and ruthless business practices make life miserable for everyone. Read full book review >

BLUE HEARTS by Jim Lehrer
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 1993

"Lehrer floats like a butterfly, but this time he doesn't sting like a bee."
Versatile TV journalist/memoirist/satirist Lehrer (Short List, 1992, etc.) adds espionage to his resumé with this likable extended anecdote about two old CIA grads who accidentally stir up a mess of Kennedy-assassination trouble 30 years after the fact. Read full book review >
PLEADING GUILTY by Scott Turow
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 1, 1993

"But his legions of fans surely won't miss the chance to see Turow as they've never seen him before."
Instead of cranking out clones of Presumed Innocent, Turow has preferred to take chances—first with The Burden of Proof, which dispensed with his whodunit plot, and now, even more radically, with a foulmouthed, alcoholic lawyer's account of his search for one of his missing partners—and the $5.6 million that vanished with him. Read full book review >
STRANGE THINGS AND STRANGER PLACES by Ramsey Campbell
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 1993

"With so much Campbell to read or reread, only die-hard fans will want to bother with these scrappy leavings."
A middle-drawer miscellany—eight stories and two novellas- -that spans the 20-year career of British horror-writer Campbell. Read full book review >

NEVER SEND FLOWERS by John E. Gardner
THRILLERS
Released: May 31, 1993

"As Gardner struggles to update the perils his superstar hero faces, Bond himself remains the biggest anachronism of all."
Like Pentagon dinosaurs laboring to adapt to a new world order by finding telltale traces of the old in every dark shadow, Gardner's reincarnation of James Bond examines a string of serial killings and finds a freelance terrorist just as dangerous as his old adversaries from SMERSH and SPECTRE. Read full book review >
CROSSING BY NIGHT by David Aaron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 21, 1993

"Aaron's best yet."
Grand espionage-adventure at the dawn of WW II, with the lovely wrinkle that the spy is a woman: American-born Elizabeth Pack, whose real-life exploits on behalf of the British take on stirring fictional form courtesy of Aaron (Agent of Influence, 1988, etc.) Read full book review >
KALEIDOSCOPE EYES by Graham Watkins
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: May 14, 1993

"Worth a try, though it might be wise to call it quits after the hot chili peppers."
Sadomasochistic shivers about an incarnate Aztec goddess and the spell she casts over six North Carolina yuppies. Read full book review >
THE VANISHING by Tim Krabbé
THRILLERS
Released: May 10, 1993

"For connoisseurs of intellectual horror."
This austere and cinematic Dutch novella (published abroad in 1984 as The Golden Egg) is KrabbÇ's first US appearance but has already served as the basis for two movies directed by George Sluizer: a 1988 version in Dutch, which has all the chilling, obsessive focus of the book; and an American remake, which recently bombed at the box office, even though the director softened the nightmarish aspects of its two sources. Read full book review >
I'LL BE SEEING YOU by Mary Higgins Clark
THRILLERS
Released: May 5, 1993

"But nobody will care. (Literary Guild Triple Selection for July)"
Welcome back to Clarkland, where the menace to young womanhood is piled on as thick as whipped cream, and where, this time, a TV reporter's investigation of a nefarious fertility clinic—and of her own family—is provoked by the street murder of a woman who looks like her identical twin. Read full book review >
SHADOW PLAY by Frances Fyfield
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: May 1, 1993

"Fyfield's intelligence is as ferociously penetrating as ever- -unhappy Rose is particularly well-drawn—but there's barely enough action here to keep the pot simmering while waiting for Mr. Logo's plausible maleficence to bring it to a boil."
Crown Prosecutor Helen West (Deep Sleep, 1992, etc.) takes time out from her repeated attempts to convict a chronic stalker of schoolgirls called Mr. Logo to befriend Rose Darvey, an angry, compulsively promiscuous case clerk in her office, when she runs into her at a pregnancy clinic—not realizing that Rose has a surprisingly long-standing connection with Margaret Mellors, oh-so-proper Mr. Logo's next-door neighbor and surrogate mother, a connection that's about to bear fatal fruit. Read full book review >
DR. HAGGARD'S DISEASE by Patrick McGrath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1993

"An unbearably memorable ending lifts this to classic level while the thin bright nerves of the storyline are padded with magnificent surgical detail, hospital lore, and moods you can rub your finger down."
McGrath carries on his winning streak in the short horror novel form (Spider, 1990; The Grotesque, 1989; Blood and Water and Other Tales, 1987). Dr. Haggard's disease is sexual passion, and the story of its ravages is told in flashback as the crippled hero pieces it out to the heroine's son James, an RAF pilot. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Luis Alberto Urrea
April 21, 2015

Examining the borders between one nation and another, between one person and another, Luis Alberto Urrea’s latest story collection, The Water Museum, reveals his mastery of the short form. This collection includes the Edgar-award winning "Amapola" and his now-classic "Bid Farewell to Her Many Horses," which had the honor of being chosen for NPR's "Selected Shorts" not once but twice. Urrea has also recently published a poetry collection, Tijuana Book of the Dead, mixing lyricism and colloquial voices, mysticism and the daily grind. We talk to Urrea about both of his new books this week on Kirkus TV. View video >