Thrillers Book Reviews (page 495)

A LONG FATAL LOVE CHASE by Louisa May Alcott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Much as one longs for insight into the young author's developing talent, this written-to-order serial sheds more light on what lengths a writer will go to pay for room and board. (First serial to Ladies' Home Journal; film rights to Citadel Entertainment; Literary Guild selection)"
This long-lost bit of Alcott's early, gothic-romance hack writingwritten for, but never published by, a popular magazine in 1866proves the proposition that not every bit of prose penned by favorite authors is worth the trouble to read. ``I tell you I cannot bear it! Read full book review >
GENTKILL by Paul Lindsay
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Once again, Lindsay shows that he can do it allcat-and- mouse plotting, deliciously nasty Bureau byplay, sharp domestic vignettes, dozens of sparkling anecdoteswith as much panache as his beleaguered, irresistible hero. (First printing of 50,000; author tour)"
Two more crackerjack cases for bad-boy FBI agent Mike Devlin (Witness to the Truth, 1992), whose insurance company probably worries more about his hidebound bosses than about the bomber or agent-killer he's up against. Read full book review >

RETRIBUTION by R.J. Pineiro
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

Agents of Saddam Hussein nuke 40,000 Iraqi troops marching on Kuwaitand Baton Rouge, La.in an over-the-top thriller that exposes the US to more high-tech perils than ever endured by Pauline of a Saturday matinee. Read full book review >
SLEEPER SPY by William Safire
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Engaging and cunningly plottedwith a wealth of diverting asides on the self-importance of journalists, the duplicity of officialdom, the venality of big-time literary agents, and other of civilized society's burdens. (Author tour)"
Word maven and New York Times columnist Safire's third novel (Freedom, 1987; Full Disclosure, 1977): a transnational thriller with immensely entertaining results. Read full book review >
RANGE OF MOTION by Elizabeth Berg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"Comas can be soap-opera stuff, and though Berg is much better than that, there's still a formula finish here: Waking up is hard to do. (Author tour)"
Berg could be creating a new genrethe bedside vigil novelwith last year's Talk Before Sleep and this latest, a sometimes poignant but squarely predictable story of a young wife waiting for her husband to wake from a coma. Read full book review >

EYE OF THE BEHOLDER by Brian Lysaght
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"A lively, eventful entertainment whose archvillain bears only a passing resemblance to world-class grifter Robert Vescowho, after 25 years on the lam, has recently been detained by Cuban authorities."
A cynically stylish thriller from the long-dormant Lysaght (Sweet Deals, 1985, etc.). Read full book review >
THE DOUBLE TONGUE by William Golding
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1995

"The Nobelist's stature may have made it inevitable that this be brought to market, but admirers of Golding will recognize it for what it is: intriguing, but unfinished."
The final draft of a novel-in-progress at Golding's death, in 1993, is more than a mere footnote to the distinguished work of the Nobel Prizewinnerbut far less than a full-bodied tale worthy of being judged on its own merits. Read full book review >
A CERTAIN JUSTICE by John T. Lescroart
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 31, 1995

"A richly satisfying thriller, and a breakthrough book for Lescroart. (First printing of 125,000; $150,000 ad/promo; Literary Guild featured alternate selection; author tour)"
Lescroart swings for the fences with a West Coast take on The Bonfire of the Vanities. Read full book review >
SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP by Robyn Sisman
THRILLERS
Released: Aug. 21, 1995

"Light stuff, but buoyant and fun. (Literary Guild alternate selection)"
A pleasurable if predictable first novel combining flashbacks of Oxford's 1960s counterculture with a tantalizing and barely disguised version of a modern-day American political campaign. Read full book review >
BLOOD AND THUNDER by Max Allan Collins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 14, 1995

"Even though he fails again as a bodyguard, Nate's eighth book (Carnal Hours, 1994, etc.) may be his finest hour."
Nathan Heller may be a great detective, but you don't want the man as your bodyguard. Read full book review >
THE LAST LIEUTENANT by John J. Gobbell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 14, 1995

"Lacking Frederick Forsyth's alchemical ability to transform the minutiae of military intrigue into high-voltage suspense, Gobbell is left with a million dramatic details that never quite catch fire."
The fact-based epic of an unconquerable WW II skipper's determination to escape the surrender of Corregidorpublished to coincide with the 50th anniversary of V-J Day. Read full book review >
THE LOOP by Nik Gowing
THRILLERS
Released: Aug. 14, 1995

"Gowing (The Wire, 1989) spins a series of double-crosses worthy of Len Deighton in this sorry tale of the same Old World Disorder."
A fabulous cache of gold inspires a chamber symphony of greed and betrayal in contemporary Russia. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >