Thrillers Book Reviews (page 495)

GOODLOW'S GHOSTS by T.M. Wright
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"The entire novel's a bit ghostly itself: eerie, but so thin you can see right through it."
Slackly plotted though occasionally spooky yarn about Boston- area ghosts—and the hardcover debut of psychic detective Ryerson Biergarten, whose cases Wright (Little Boy Lost, p. 498, etc.) has covered in several pseudonymous (``F.W. Armstrong'') paperbacks. Read full book review >
THE WEREWOLVES OF LONDON by Brian Stableford
THRILLERS
Released: Dec. 15, 1992

"Exposition-ridden but way off in a class of its own."
First work in an overarching eschatalogical trilogy about fallen angels that, when done, may well become a classic science fantasy. Read full book review >

COMRADE CHARLIE by Brian Freemantle
THRILLERS
Released: Dec. 9, 1992

"Intricate plotting, gripping intrigue, and a memorable romance add up to the tastiest Muffin in many a year."
After several clinkers (O'Farrell's Law, 1989, etc.), Freemantle proved with Little Grey Mice (p. 368) that he can write a solid spy novel outside of his Charlie Muffin series (The Run Around, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >
DOLORES CLAIBORNE by Stephen King
THRILLERS
Released: Dec. 7, 1992

"5 million first printing); but Dolores is a brilliantly realized character, and her struggles will hook readers inexorably."
As Jessie Burlingame lies handcuffed to her bed in Gerald's Game (p. 487), she recalls how, on the clay 30 years ago that her dad molested her, she had a vision of a woman—a murderer?—at a well King explains that vision here: Dolores Claiborne is the woman, and her story of how she killed her husband, and the consequences, proves a seductively suspenseful, if quieter, complement to Jessie's shriek-lest of a tale. Read full book review >
THE HOLIDAY MURDERS by Marsha Landreth
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 4, 1992

"Sam Turner's first case leaves you hungry for more."
When Sheridan, Wyoming, is rocked by a series of rape-murders linked to holidays from Valentine's Day to New Year's, hyperactive medical-examiner Dr. Samantha Turner painstakingly fits together the forensic evidence that enables her dimwitted police colleagues to make an arrest after Sam bushwacks the murderer herself. Read full book review >

THE WARRIORS OF GOD by William Christie
THRILLERS
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"Unusually credible villains."
Iranian terrorists take on the Great Satan on his own territory—in a competent, action-filled first thriller. Read full book review >
RUMPOLE ON TRIAL by John Mortimer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"Vive Rumpole!"
Seven more cases for the inimitably waggish defender Rumpole. Read full book review >
RAVENMOCKER by Jean Hager
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"A pretty dull excursion."
Molly Bearpaw is the lone employee of the Oklahoma branch of the Native American Advocacy League but, in this initial outing, spends most of her time playing detective. Read full book review >
INADMISSIBLE EVIDENCE by Philip Friedman
THRILLERS
Released: Nov. 30, 1992

"For pyrotechnical range and open- mouthed surprise, though, Friedman (Reasonable Doubt, 1990, etc.) has nothing on Richard North Patterson's Degree of Guilt (below). (Literary Guild Dual Selection for January)"
Three years ago, Roberto Morales, self-made developer of Brooklyn's Phoenix Project, was convicted of manslaughter in the brutal sex killing of Mariah Dodge, his associate and lover. Read full book review >
CHINESE RED by E. Howard Hunt
THRILLERS
Released: Nov. 23, 1992

"Period piece for the Cuban-cigar set."
A retired spook gets sucked back into the geopolitical slugfest in the last days of the Soviet Union, where the bad old Stalinists want to do a deal with the bad old Red Chinese to quash the threat of peace. Read full book review >
THE PORCUPINE by Julian Barnes
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 20, 1992

"Little about much."
Barnes's famously light touch is applied to a bar of lead here: the nauseated, exhausted atmosphere of a newly de-Socialized Balkan state. Read full book review >
STATE V. JUSTICE by Gallatin Warfield
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Nov. 19, 1992

"Russian diplomats, interagency rivalries, and a tooth-and-nail legal battle between wily sworn enemies—all these sure-fire hooks get neutralized by Warfield's flatly moralized characters, one-dimensional plot complications, absent-minded handling of subplots, and distaste for genuine mystery."
Despite a publicity blitz unusual for a first novel (an initial printing of 50,000), this tale of how an open-and-shut case against a convicted pedophile for the murder of a Russian diplomat's son runs up against the defense attorney's maniacal hatred of the upright D.A. doesn't give Scott Turow much competition. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >