Thrillers Book Reviews (page 495)

JUGGLING THE STARS by Tim Parks
THRILLERS
Released: March 1, 1993

"His move into the suspense field is a triumph."
A down-at-heel English teacher in Italy goes on a crime spree: in his sixth novel (but first thriller), the British expatriate Parks (the nonfiction Italian Neighbors, p. 658, etc.) turns up the heat, with wonderfully scary results. Read full book review >
AGYAR by Steven Brust
THRILLERS
Released: March 1, 1993

"Brust accomplishes with a wry turn of phrase or a small flourish what others never achieve despite hundreds of gory spatters."
Impressively wrought modern vampire/redemption yarn, from the author of The Phoenix Guards, The Gypsy (p. 641), etc. Arriving in the quiet college town of Lakota, Ohio, Agyar Janos takes up residence in an empty, furnished house—abandoned because it's haunted by Jim, the ghost of an escaped slave. Read full book review >

AGGRESSOR by Nick Cook
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 24, 1993

"Wonderful Egyptian scenery."
A terrorist hijacking in Lebanon forces Americans and Russians to collaborate on a rescue mission and brings a British journalist back to the Middle East and the scene of his wife's murder. Read full book review >
THE NOBLE PATH by Peter May
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 22, 1993

"May (The Man With No Face, 1981) gives his Mission: Impossible yarn the boost of sharp locations, passionate decrials of the world's indifference to the region's suffering, and a distinctly original handling of the genre's conventions."
Deadeyed British soldier-of-fortune Jack Elliot—hired in 1978 by wealthy Cambodian refugee Ang Yuon to retrieve the family he abandoned during the evacuation of Phnom Penh—runs into all the obstacles you'd expect, and then some. Read full book review >
A DEATH FOR A DODO by E.X. Giroux
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 22, 1993

"A downer for this usually satisfying author."
Barrister-sleuth Robert Forsythe, sans faithful secretary Abigail Sanderson (A Death for a Dancing Doll, 1991, etc.), is recuperating from knee surgery in the lush Damien Day rest home—a hospital for the sick, addicted, or obese rich enough to afford it. Read full book review >

HARD EVIDENCE by John T. Lescroart
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 18, 1993

"But Lescroart's laid-back, soft-shoe approach to legal intrigue is all his own. (First printing of 50,000)"
The shaggy lawyer/bartender of The Vig (1991) tries his hand at blockbuster courtroom drama—in an engaging crossover novel written with both eyes firmly on Scott Turow. Read full book review >
BURNING THE APOSTLE by Bill Granger
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 15, 1993

"Deveraux gets less and less mannered, and that's to the better."
The cold war is over, but the November Man continues. Read full book review >
INTERRUPT by Toni Dwiggins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Electronically impaired readers will find themselves at times overburdened with technodata."
Communications engineers duke it out through the telephone circuits—in a tele-technothriller about a plot to annihilate the nation's electronic call-switching systems. Read full book review >
NOW YOU KNOW by Michael Frayn
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Frayn seems bent on a single-handed crusade to restore plotting to a central place in the British novel."
What happens when an improbable love affair brings a freedom-of- information lobby under the microscope itself: another melancholy farce by the gifted British playwright (Noises Off, Benefactors) and novelist (The Trick of It, 1990; A Landing on the Sun, 1992). Read full book review >
BLACK BLADE by Eric Van Lustbader
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"With hokum this thick Lustbader can't afford a smile—but his comic-book readers will smile long into the night."
Fans of Lustbader's whirligig exotic actioners (The Ninja, Angel Eyes) will find no lessening of his midair double-somersault reverse plotting here. Read full book review >
ALONG CAME A SPIDER by James Patterson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Cross is a likable hero, but with a watery plot and weak villain—Hannibal Lecter would eat Soneji for breakfast—he doesn't have much to work with here."
Catchy title; too bad the psychothriller behind it—despite the publisher's big push—is a mostly routine tale of cop vs. serial-killer. Read full book review >
HEADING UPTOWN by Marissa Piesman
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

Forget Roger Simon. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >