Thrillers Book Reviews (page 497)

THE BLACK CAT by Robert Poe
THRILLERS
Released: Nov. 13, 1997

"Gentlemanly, undemanding variation on the master's work."
Poe, a distant relative of Edgar Allan, follows up his debut psychological thriller, Return to the House of Usher (1996), with another variation on a classic Poe story, again set in Crowley Creek, Virginia. Read full book review >
DOUBLE BLIND by Ken Goddard
THRILLERS
Released: Nov. 12, 1997

"An addled, awkwardly plotted narrative that strains for, and fails to achieve, devil-may-care effects."
The usually reliable Goddard (Cheater, 1996, etc.) offers a murky, inane, farcical thriller in which federal agents unwittingly work at cross purposes while trying to bag the vindictive villains who are secretly after them. Read full book review >

THE GHOST by Danielle Steel
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 5, 1997

"Despite the usual Steelian menu of love, pain, and compassion, most fans will figure out the ending long before they get to it—and could probably supply the cadences as well."
In her 41st novel (Special Delivery, p. 751, etc.), Steel weaves touches of the paranormal into a historical romance. Read full book review >
IRRESISTIBLE IMPULSE by Robert K. Tanenbaum
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Nov. 3, 1997

"Fans hooked on Tanenbaum's mastery of detail and his gripping way with every single plotline won't care that this time his three-ring circus lacks a true headliner. (Literary Guild/Mystery Guild main selections)"
A serial killer who preys on elderly black women is only the main course in this smorgasbord of homicides—some proposed, some already disposed —for Butch Karp and his wife Marlene Ciampi. Read full book review >
WITHOUT CONSENT by Frances Fyfield
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Downbeat all the way but, still, powerfully engrossing."
Helen West, a lawyer for London's Crown Prosecution Service, deals mostly with cases of rape and the often hapless victims she has to persuade to carry their accusations to court (A Clear Conscience, 1995, etc.). Read full book review >

SHADE OF PALE by Greg Kihn
THRILLERS
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Less original but better told than Horror Show."
Ex-rock-and-roll star Kihn's first novel, Horror Show (1996), was a romp based on the satirical film Ed Wood. Read full book review >
GRACE AND FAVOR by Thomas Caplan
THRILLERS
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Could have been told just as intelligibly in half the pages—and more enjoyably in a quarter."
A sort of transatlantic Dallas, in which Caplan (Parallelogram, 1987, etc.) portrays a sophisticated young American who climbs high enough on the social ladder to see just how foolish he's been. Read full book review >
REIGN IN HELL by William Diehl
THRILLERS
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Fizzy male wish-fulfillment that bulges with Clancyesque histrionics, frothing fundamentalist foment, and more than you want to know about hate groups and RICO indictments. (Literary Guild main selection/Mystery Guild selection; author tour)"
Veteran thriller writer Diehl pits scrappy Chicago lawyer Martin Vail against Bible-thumping militia maniacs and Vail's old adversary, psychokiller Aaron Stampler, in a mindless plotboiler that never fails to please. Read full book review >
CROMARTIE V. THE GOD SHIVA by Rumer Godden
THRILLERS
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"A delight for Godden's many followers, one encompassing the experience of the beauties and traditions of India, the richness of its religions, and Godden's own essential dash of gallantry and grand gestures."
About to celebrate her 90th birthday, Godden, author of over 60 books for adults and children, again writes with grace and a cheerfully lilting prose, evoking the mannered high-style of a cultivated English/Indian backwater. Read full book review >
CAT AND MOUSE by James Patterson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Having reached the peak of his popularity, Patterson is spinning his wheels."
Archly improbable multiple psychokiller tale featuring Patterson's dignified Washington, D.C., detective, Alex Cross (Jack and Jill, 1996, etc.). Read full book review >
A SMALL DARK PLACE by Martin Schenk
THRILLERS
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Next time around, he should break some of them. (First printing of 100,000; film rights to New Line; Literary Guild selection)"
Derivative, tightly told heartland horror tale that, in aspiring to be a Stephen King knock-off, brims with the master's strengths—and failings. Read full book review >
THE ILLUSIONIST by Dinitia Smith
THRILLERS
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Still, both prove memorable in this haunting exploration of a senseless and brutal murder."
The unfathomable mysteries of sexual identity and charisma permeate this dark, meditative tale of a transsexual's murder in upstate New York, by the author of The Hard Rain (1980) and Remember This (1989)—inspired by an actual incident in Nebraska. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Yoojin Grace Wuertz
February 27, 2017

In Yoojin Grace Wuertz’s debut novel Everything Belongs to Us, the setting is Seoul in 1978. At South Korea’s top university, the nation’s best and brightest compete to join the professional elite of an authoritarian regime. Success could lead to a life of rarefied privilege and wealth; failure means being left irrevocably behind. For childhood friends Jisun and Namin, the stakes couldn’t be more different. Jisun, the daughter of a powerful business mogul, grew up on a mountainside estate with lush gardens and a dedicated chauffeur. Namin’s parents run a tented food cart from dawn to curfew; her sister works in a shoe factory. Now Jisun wants as little to do with her father’s world as possible, abandoning her schoolwork in favor of the underground activist movement, while Namin studies tirelessly in the service of one goal: to launch herself and her family out of poverty. But everything changes when Jisun and Namin meet an ambitious, charming student named Sunam, whose need to please his family has led him to a prestigious club: the Circle. Under the influence of his mentor, Juno, a manipulative social climber, Sunam becomes entangled with both women, as they all make choices that will change their lives forever. “Engrossing,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. “Wuertz is an important new voice in American fiction.” View video >