Thrillers Book Reviews (page 497)

BREAKTHROUGH by R.J. Pineiro
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"A rough-and-tumble entertainment with violent action and plot twists aplenty."
The development of a revolutionary new computer chip by a Silicon Valley scientist puts him and his colleagues in mortal peril from the US and German governments—in a suspenseful, transnational thriller from Pineiro (Exposure, 1996, etc.). Read full book review >
JACK FAUST by Michael Swanwick
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"And yet the reader is constrained to ask, so what?"
What if Faust in the 16th century had been offered the knowledge available in the 20th? Read full book review >

ACCIDENTS WILL HAPPEN by Julian Rathbone
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Rathbone (Sand Blind, 1994, etc.) keeps everything stylishly knowing, jaundiced, and off-kilter until the final movement, which smacks just a bit too much of Quentin Tarantino shootouts."
Nobody but the fledgling Regional Department for Environmental Crime (DUK in German) cares about Roger Vesper, an inoffensive lab technician at the Regional Cancer Hospital who may be the key to cracking a case involving some missing experimental antibiotics. Read full book review >
THE PRESENCE by John Saul
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Nicely done indeed: strange, disturbing goings-on, with only two spoonsful of outrageous melodrama."
A suspenseful thriller from the prolific and craftsmanlike Saul (The Homing, 1993, etc.) that moves like a dream through its paradisiacal Hawaiian landscape. Read full book review >
PRESUMED GUILTY by Junius Podrug
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"An interesting examination of alien jurisprudence, overwhelmed by campy melodrama, kinky theatrics, and cartoon violence."
Torturously contrived, wildly improbable woman-in-peril/legal procedural set in a darkly perverse post-Communist Moscow, from mystically inclined lawyer-author Podrug (Frost of Heaven, 1992). Read full book review >

LIFE SUPPORT by Tess Gerritsen
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"A satisfyingly nefarious scheme, some tentative romance, and enough medical rushing-about to satisfy hardcore ER fans add up to a lively ride."
Former internist Gerritsen follows Harvest (1996) with another far-fetched but effective medical thriller. Read full book review >
ROUGH JUSTICE by Lisa Scottoline
THRILLERS
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Expect this to be her breakout book."
Scottoline clinches her title as the distaff Grisham with this gorgeously plotted novel based on a trial lawyer's worst nightmare. Read full book review >
THE YEAR'S BEST FANTASY AND HORROR by Ellen Datlow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"There are over 40 entries here, in a collection not to be missed by anyone seriously interested in fantasy or horror."
The variety of this top-flight annual never fails to appeal, in part because it covers so much material, including, along with the best stories, obituaries of writers whose files have closed, a review of the year's best fantasy in film, television, and comic books, and summations of the year's activities in horror and fantasy. Read full book review >
THE LAZARUS HOTEL by Jo Bannister
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 16, 1997

"A superior pastiche—And Then There Were Nuts for the '90s- -more clever and nuanced than its famous original; the sort of tour de force that gives melodrama a good name."
Bannister takes a break from her admirable Castlemere CID series (No Birds Sing, 1996, etc.) with a weekend in London's posh Lazaire's Hotel, where seven jittery guests have gathered for a Personal Discovery Course with a few glitches. Read full book review >
BLOOD RELATIONS by John A. Peak
THRILLERS
Released: Aug. 16, 1997

"There's something for everyone in Peak's second (Spare Change, 1994), which begins in somber shadows, moves through some tangled investigations, and ends with a fine volley of gunfire."
PILOTS DIE FASTER by C.W. Morton
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 15, 1997

"Superior sherlocking in an offbeat milieu, from an author who uses the peculiar mores of a closed community and the vagaries of military justice to excellent effect."
A US Navy aircraft carrier on maneuvers is the possibility- laden scene of the crime in this first in a series from the pseudonymous Morton. Read full book review >
SWEEPERS by P.T. Deutermann
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 14, 1997

"A quality on-the-run yarn that, if less plausible than the author's previous efforts, features appealing lower-echelon military personnel for whom honor, obligation, and country are not just words but credos."
Deutermann (Official Privilege, 1995, etc.) returns to the scene of US Navy crimes with a twisty thriller detailing the lengths to which the seagoing service will go to protect its own and deep-six potentially embarrassing scandals. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >