Thrillers Book Reviews (page 497)

GALILEE by Clive Barker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1998

"Overheated and intermittently risible, but the thing is entertaining: the kind of book for which hammocks were invented—not to mention double boilermakers. ($150,000 ad/promo; author tour; TV satellite tour)"
Though its ghoul and demon quotient is comparatively low, this lavishly campy creeper has a legitimate claim to the title of Weirdest Book Yet by the accomplished author of such genre classics as The Books of Blood (1988) and The Damnation Game (1987). Read full book review >
A CHILL IN THE BLOOD by P.N. Elrod
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: June 1, 1998

"Snappy vampire-with-a-conscience yarn, laced with a blackish humor that comes in somewhere between wry and wisecracking."
Hardcover outing for this established series entitled The Vampire Files, from the author of another vampire yarn (Keeper of the King, 1997, with Nigel Bennett). Read full book review >

UNDERTOW by Tom Foote
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 25, 1998

"Still, the story's ho-hum plot is supported by taut writing, strong detail, and an unusual compassion for a bunch of mixed-up Irishmen too angry to know that they're their own worst enemies: a satisfying, above-average page-turner for Forsythe and Higgins fans."
Routine but absorbing debut nautical thriller about a seasoned salt who avenges the death of his family by infiltrating an IRA terrorist cell, from an Irishman who knows his surf. Read full book review >
THE GRAVITY OF SHADOWS by David Ramus
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 15, 1998

"A flaccid pudding that mushes together serious issues with outtakes from Baywatch and Miami Vice, although the art history details and Palm Beach milieu ring true."
Scattered, amateurish thriller featuring an art dealer-as-sleuth poking around the mansions of Palm Beach society, by a former art dealer and heroin addict. Read full book review >
DEADVILLE by Robert F. Jones
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 15, 1998

"Jones's raw, lyric voice is all his own, and can both disturb and shock."
Historically authentic detail is a hallmark of Jones's Western fiction (Tie My Bones to Her Back, 1996, etc.)—and he is as well a gifted bird-hunter and ornithologist (Dangers in the Sunset Sky, 1996). Read full book review >

DAMASCUS GATE by Robert Stone
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 14, 1998

"Not to be missed."
Stone's inordinately ambitious sixth novel, which in several surface ways resembles his A Flag for Sunrise (1981), grapples with intractable issues of political and religious faith, compromise, and betrayal. Read full book review >
THE STUDENT BODY by Jane Harvard
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 13, 1998

"Its characters are uniformly flat and unengaging, and its byzantine plot, while admirably coherent, is too busy and far- fetched to satisfy."
The tepid tale of a prostitution ring—courtesy of —Harvard,— the pseudonym adopted by four alums who've joined forces to serve up a novel set at their august alma mater. Read full book review >
THE DOCTOR DIGS A GRAVE by Robin Hathaway
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 13, 1998

"Lovers of hospital drama, in particular, will welcome a return visit."
Dr. Andrew Fenimore, a late-30s bachelor, has an unlikely double profession—medical doctor and private eye. Read full book review >
DEAD EVEN by Brad Meltzer
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 13, 1998

"To top all this off, author Meltzer is an attorney himself, which lends the novel's dialogue a sparkling undercurrent of real-life chitchat, not to mention the mutual saber-sharpening that readers will quickly pick up on and enjoy as a bonus. (Author tour)"
A very aptly titled gripper (received too late for a full review) that will have Grisham slapping his wife's wrist in pique over the breakfast toast when he discovers Meltzer's plot for his second novel (The Tenth Justice, 1997). Read full book review >
THE BOY by Naeem Murr
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 12, 1998

"Technically a capable debut, though the unreality both of its Mephistophelean central figure and of his beneficiaries and victims makes it, finally, unconvincing."
An intensely dramatic, well-constructed, but unfortunately overwritten debut—about an androgynous teenager's powerful effects on those who fall under his spell—by a Lebanese-Irish American heretofore known for his poetry. Read full book review >
DOUBLE IMAGE by David Morrell
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 12, 1998

"Think Vertigo rewritten for Steven Seagal. (Book-of-the-Month Club alternate selection)"
Morrell (Extreme Denial, 1996, etc.) slams two wildly unrelated stories together to produce this misshapen, empty, though greased-lightning thriller. Read full book review >
HOUSE OF MANY ROOMS by Marius Gabriel
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 11, 1998

"Well-written and perfectly paced: a sexy, gripping thriller that doesn't miss a beat."
Gabriel's third romantic suspenser (The Mask of Time, 1994, etc.) is a taut—and tense'story of a woman who must choose between a man she loves and a long-lost daughter, a choice complicated by the fact that either one of them may be a murderer. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Katey Sagal
author of GRACE NOTES
April 10, 2017

In her memoir Grace Notes, actress and singer/songwriter Katey Sagal takes you through the highs and lows of her life, from the tragic deaths of her parents to her long years in the Los Angeles rock scene, from being diagnosed with cancer at the age of twenty-eight to getting her big break on the fledgling FOX network as the wise-cracking Peggy Bundy on the beloved sitcom Married…with Children. Sparse and poetic, Grace Notes is an emotionally riveting tale of struggle and success, both professional and personal: Sagal’s path to sobriety; the stillbirth of her first daughter, Ruby; motherhood; the experience of having her third daughter at age 52 with the help of a surrogate; and her lifelong passion for music. “While this book is sure to please the author’s many fans, its thoughtful, no-regrets honesty will no doubt also appeal to readers of Hollywood memoirs seeking substance that goes beyond gossip and name-dropping,” our critic writes. “A candid, reflective memoir.” View video >