Thrillers Book Reviews (page 497)

PRIVATE PRACTICES by Stephen White
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Book us for another session, please. (First printing of 35,000)"
If White is to be believed, clinical psychology ranks as a dangerous profession right up there with police work, firefighting, and livery-cab driving. Read full book review >
PRIMAL FEAR by William Diehl
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"It'll make a great movie, though. (Film rights to Paramount)"
Though Diehl never breaks new thriller-ground, he generally does a fine job of hoeing others' rows—from the cop-novel Sharky's Machine (1978) through the mob novel Hooligans (1984) and the Nazi- conspiracy novel 27 (1990). Read full book review >

RED BRIDE by Christopher Fowler
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"For some readers, the willing suspension of disbelief will snap before everything's tied up."
Satan and the supernatural worm their way into the British film scene via a glamorous model who vamps a hitherto straight-arrow publicist. Read full book review >
DEATHRIGHT by Dev Stryker
THRILLERS
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"Cold-eyed Billy Starr never would've relied on such a feeble cover story."
``It was preposterous. Read full book review >
GOODLOW'S GHOSTS by T.M. Wright
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Jan. 1, 1993

"The entire novel's a bit ghostly itself: eerie, but so thin you can see right through it."
Slackly plotted though occasionally spooky yarn about Boston- area ghosts—and the hardcover debut of psychic detective Ryerson Biergarten, whose cases Wright (Little Boy Lost, p. 498, etc.) has covered in several pseudonymous (``F.W. Armstrong'') paperbacks. Read full book review >

THE WEREWOLVES OF LONDON by Brian Stableford
THRILLERS
Released: Dec. 15, 1992

"Exposition-ridden but way off in a class of its own."
First work in an overarching eschatalogical trilogy about fallen angels that, when done, may well become a classic science fantasy. Read full book review >
COMRADE CHARLIE by Brian Freemantle
THRILLERS
Released: Dec. 9, 1992

"Intricate plotting, gripping intrigue, and a memorable romance add up to the tastiest Muffin in many a year."
After several clinkers (O'Farrell's Law, 1989, etc.), Freemantle proved with Little Grey Mice (p. 368) that he can write a solid spy novel outside of his Charlie Muffin series (The Run Around, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >
DOLORES CLAIBORNE by Stephen King
THRILLERS
Released: Dec. 7, 1992

"5 million first printing); but Dolores is a brilliantly realized character, and her struggles will hook readers inexorably."
As Jessie Burlingame lies handcuffed to her bed in Gerald's Game (p. 487), she recalls how, on the clay 30 years ago that her dad molested her, she had a vision of a woman—a murderer?—at a well King explains that vision here: Dolores Claiborne is the woman, and her story of how she killed her husband, and the consequences, proves a seductively suspenseful, if quieter, complement to Jessie's shriek-lest of a tale. Read full book review >
THE HOLIDAY MURDERS by Marsha Landreth
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Dec. 4, 1992

"Sam Turner's first case leaves you hungry for more."
When Sheridan, Wyoming, is rocked by a series of rape-murders linked to holidays from Valentine's Day to New Year's, hyperactive medical-examiner Dr. Samantha Turner painstakingly fits together the forensic evidence that enables her dimwitted police colleagues to make an arrest after Sam bushwacks the murderer herself. Read full book review >
THE WARRIORS OF GOD by William Christie
THRILLERS
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"Unusually credible villains."
Iranian terrorists take on the Great Satan on his own territory—in a competent, action-filled first thriller. Read full book review >
RUMPOLE ON TRIAL by John Mortimer
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"Vive Rumpole!"
Seven more cases for the inimitably waggish defender Rumpole. Read full book review >
RAVENMOCKER by Jean Hager
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 1992

"A pretty dull excursion."
Molly Bearpaw is the lone employee of the Oklahoma branch of the Native American Advocacy League but, in this initial outing, spends most of her time playing detective. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Frank Bruni
March 31, 2015

Over the last few decades, Americans have turned college admissions into a terrifying and occasionally devastating process, preceded by test prep, tutors, all sorts of stratagems, all kinds of rankings, and a conviction among too many young people that their futures will be determined and their worth established by which schools say yes and which say no. In Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be, New York Times columnist Frank Bruni explains why, giving students and their parents a new perspective on this brutal, deeply flawed competition and a path out of the anxiety that it provokes. “Written in a lively style but carrying a wallop, this is a book that family and educators cannot afford to overlook as they try to navigate the treacherous waters of college admissions,” our reviewer writes. View video >