Thrillers Book Reviews (page 498)

A DEATH FOR A DODO by E.X. Giroux
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 22, 1993

"A downer for this usually satisfying author."
Barrister-sleuth Robert Forsythe, sans faithful secretary Abigail Sanderson (A Death for a Dancing Doll, 1991, etc.), is recuperating from knee surgery in the lush Damien Day rest home—a hospital for the sick, addicted, or obese rich enough to afford it. Read full book review >
HARD EVIDENCE by John T. Lescroart
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 18, 1993

"But Lescroart's laid-back, soft-shoe approach to legal intrigue is all his own. (First printing of 50,000)"
The shaggy lawyer/bartender of The Vig (1991) tries his hand at blockbuster courtroom drama—in an engaging crossover novel written with both eyes firmly on Scott Turow. Read full book review >

BURNING THE APOSTLE by Bill Granger
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 15, 1993

"Deveraux gets less and less mannered, and that's to the better."
The cold war is over, but the November Man continues. Read full book review >
INTERRUPT by Toni Dwiggins
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Electronically impaired readers will find themselves at times overburdened with technodata."
Communications engineers duke it out through the telephone circuits—in a tele-technothriller about a plot to annihilate the nation's electronic call-switching systems. Read full book review >
NOW YOU KNOW by Michael Frayn
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Frayn seems bent on a single-handed crusade to restore plotting to a central place in the British novel."
What happens when an improbable love affair brings a freedom-of- information lobby under the microscope itself: another melancholy farce by the gifted British playwright (Noises Off, Benefactors) and novelist (The Trick of It, 1990; A Landing on the Sun, 1992). Read full book review >

BLACK BLADE by Eric Van Lustbader
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"With hokum this thick Lustbader can't afford a smile—but his comic-book readers will smile long into the night."
Fans of Lustbader's whirligig exotic actioners (The Ninja, Angel Eyes) will find no lessening of his midair double-somersault reverse plotting here. Read full book review >
ALONG CAME A SPIDER by James Patterson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Cross is a likable hero, but with a watery plot and weak villain—Hannibal Lecter would eat Soneji for breakfast—he doesn't have much to work with here."
Catchy title; too bad the psychothriller behind it—despite the publisher's big push—is a mostly routine tale of cop vs. serial-killer. Read full book review >
HEADING UPTOWN by Marissa Piesman
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

Forget Roger Simon. Read full book review >
PREDATORS by Ed Gorman
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Steak-tartare-and-potatoes, with a few extras."
Suspense-oriented horror anthology of 21 stories, awash in slice-and-dice, that's nearly indistinguishable from its so-so predecessor, Stalkers (1989). Read full book review >
FRUITING BODIES AND OTHER FUNGI by Brian Lumley
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1993

"Nice stuff—but most necessary for the title story."
Witch's dozen of 13 horror tales by Lumley (Blood Brothers, p. 630), largely mainstream with just a touch of Lovecraft in the night. Read full book review >
SUTURES by Christopher Sanford
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 28, 1993

"Weightless entertainment—though possibly a welcome distraction for this year's initiates in the call room."
A brief, amiable first novel about a medical intern's life that's as entertaining as—and no more elucidating than—a late- night conversation in an after-hours bar. Read full book review >
THE LAST SPY by Bob Reiss
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Jan. 21, 1993

"High-velocity action plus clever interludes—as when Ash confesses to his girlfriend that he's a spy—add up to a smart, taut thriller, Reiss's best by far."
Crackerjack spy yarn about an ultra-deep Soviet agent trying to come in from the cold—and a big step up for Reiss, who's previously spun out only so-so thrillers (Flamingo, 1989; Saltmaker, 1988, etc.). Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Luis Alberto Urrea
April 21, 2015

Examining the borders between one nation and another, between one person and another, Luis Alberto Urrea’s latest story collection, The Water Museum, reveals his mastery of the short form. This collection includes the Edgar-award winning "Amapola" and his now-classic "Bid Farewell to Her Many Horses," which had the honor of being chosen for NPR's "Selected Shorts" not once but twice. Urrea has also recently published a poetry collection, Tijuana Book of the Dead, mixing lyricism and colloquial voices, mysticism and the daily grind. We talk to Urrea about both of his new books this week on Kirkus TV. View video >