Thrillers Book Reviews (page 498)

POWER IN THE BLOOD by E.L. Wyrick
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 8, 1996

"A smaller shoal of red herrings would have lessened the confusion here, but Wyrick keeps the loose ends suspenseful, sustains his heroine's likability, and, along the way, gives the reader a penetrating look at the sleazy world of county politics."
Tammi Randall, a pretty young attorney for the Legal Aid Society in Patsboro, Teal County, Georgia, has mostly recovered from her rape attack of a year ago (A Strange and Bitter Crop, 1994, not reviewed), thanks to therapy and strenuous self-defense training. Read full book review >
THE WORLD ON BLOOD by Jonathan Nasaw
THRILLERS
Released: April 8, 1996

"But vampies must be vampies- -and Nick's choice is amusing if not convincing. (Literary Guild selection)"
Mildly supernatural, erotic tale from the author of West of the Moon (1987), etc., this about a mixed sexual bag of 12 vampires who form Vampires Anonymous in San Francisco, treat blood as an addictive drug, and hew to the Twelve Steps of AA. Read full book review >

SERIOUS INTENT by Margaret Yorke
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 4, 1996

"But readers with a taste for Yorke's grim counterpoint won't complain."
The boys who hang around The Willows, the house of old Tom Morton—Steve Burton, 14, and his friend Mark Conway, 10—don't give any thought to their casual deceptions or thefts. Read full book review >
THE GRID by Philip Kerr
THRILLERS
Released: April 2, 1996

"When the funhouse terrors have abated, though, it's sad to see a writer of Kerr's dark gifts riding this cornball express to the bank. (Film rights to Polygram)"
Imagine HAL, the murderously defensive computer of 2001, in charge of a state-of-the-art Los Angeles office building, and you have the premise for Kerr's witty, eminently predictable blockbuster. Read full book review >
THE LAST PUMPKIN PAPER by Bob Oeste
THRILLERS
Released: April 2, 1996

"A jaunty, sure-handed replay of a cause cÇläbre, which, despite an arguably unexpected document, plays completely fair throughout."
First-novelist Oeste offers a fresh fictive twist on a controversial old case (that of Alger Hiss)—a debut that, while likely to offend both liberals and conservatives, will leave less partisan readers delighted with the deliciously wicked way it resolves the issue of the convicted perjurer's guilt or innocence. Read full book review >

SOUNDING THE WATERS by James Glickman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 1996

"A skillful exposition of very little: Glickman seems to have mastered the politician's art of using rhetoric to inflate the mundane without transfiguring its shape."
On his first outing, Glickman takes us into the deep waters of political turmoil in a tale that carries its resemblance to All the King's Men a bit too heavily and far. Read full book review >
REFLECTION by Diane Chamberlain
THRILLERS
Released: April 1, 1996

"A fast-paced, engrossing read focusing on a delightful pair of characters."
The time-tested technique of withholding information works admirably in this fifth novel from Chamberlain (Brass Ring, 1994, etc.): a suspenseful (if somewhat unlikely) story of two women's attempts to come to terms with the past. Read full book review >
A JURY OF HER PEERS by Jean Hanff Korelitz
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 1, 1996

"Paging Oliver Stone."
A monstrous-conspiracy wolf in legal-intrigue clothing. Read full book review >
KILLER.APP by Barbara D’Amato
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: April 1, 1996

"D'Amato's care in making the technical stuff accessible to novices instead of using it, Clancy-like, to bludgeon the gentle reader pays off in a smart, swift-moving cyberthriller for the rest of us."
Worried about Bill Gates's economic clout? Read full book review >
BROTHERS by Ben Bova
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: April 1, 1996

"An effective mix of science, politics, and family struggle in a novel that should reach a wide audience."
A biotechnical breakthrough throws two brothers into conflict in this high-tech thriller set in a "science court" in the nation's capital. Read full book review >
OUTLAWS by Tim Green
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: March 31, 1996

"In place of an alluring central character, there's a sadistic cipher; and instead of an agile plot, a compensatory tangle of awkward subplots. (First printing of 100,000; $100,000 ad/promo; author satellite tour)"
Former Atlanta Falcons player Green, now a TV color analyst, has taken a stab at football-themed thrillers twice before (Titans, 1994, etc.), with tepid results; this time, he tosses a killing-machine CIA operative into the less-than-gripping mix. Read full book review >
THE ENEMY WITHIN by Larry Bond
THRILLERS
Released: March 15, 1996

"A triple-A Bond."
The ripsnorting, all-too-plausible latest from bestselling Bond (Cauldron, 1993, etc.) pits a duo of dynamic Americans against a mad Iranian bent on altering the geopolitical balance of power. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Emma Straub
author of MODERN LOVERS
May 30, 2016

In Emma Straub’s new novel Modern Lovers, friends and former college bandmates Elizabeth and Andrew and Zoe have watched one another marry, buy real estate, and start businesses and families, all while trying to hold on to the identities of their youth. But nothing ages them like having to suddenly pass the torch (of sexuality, independence, and the ineffable alchemy of cool) to their own offspring. Back in the band’s heyday, Elizabeth put on a snarl over her Midwestern smile, Andrew let his unwashed hair grow past his chin, and Zoe was the lesbian all the straight women wanted to sleep with. Now nearing fifty, they all live within shouting distance in the same neighborhood deep in gentrified Brooklyn, and the trappings of the adult world seem to have arrived with ease. But the summer that their children reach maturity (and start sleeping together), the fabric of the adult lives suddenly begins to unravel, and the secrets and revelations that are finally let loose—about themselves, and about the famous fourth band member who soared and fell without them—can never be reclaimed. “Straub’s characters are a quirky and interesting bunch, well aware of their own good fortune, and it’s a pleasure spending time with them in leafy Ditmas Park,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >