Thrillers Book Reviews (page 498)

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1995

"Any reader who cares about short work in these two genres will here find a rich sample of the best."
Datlow and Windling's definitive collection of short fantasy and horror fiction enters its eighth year (1994) with a veritable feast of stories, poems, and commentary on the genres they cover: 53 pieces in all. Read full book review >
FOR LOVE OF SARAH by Angelica Scott
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 31, 1995

"You're never sure about Georgie's true motives, and the jury's ruling in no way settles this very central issue."
A psychological thriller about murder, incest, and lies from Scott (a pseudonym) that's a bit too puzzling and melodramatic to deliver the kick it tries for. Read full book review >

MADELEINE'S GHOST by Robert Girardi
THRILLERS
Released: July 25, 1995

"The romance in Girardi's first novel has an undeniable sappiness, but entrancing scenes and characters, exquisite timing, and a mausoleum full of plot twists make for a fluid and truly memorable delight."
Corrupted Creole civility complicates the life of a Brooklyn bohemian—in a spirited debut deftly mingling past, present, and the vastly different worldviews of New Orleans and New York. Read full book review >
THE LADIES OF THE VALE by Andrew Puckett
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: July 21, 1995

"A charmless heroine and a flat-footed style are no help in this exercise in tedium."
Cardiology patients (especially those with donor organ cards) at St. Read full book review >
MEMNOCH THE DEVIL by Anne Rice
THRILLERS
Released: July 21, 1995

"Not Christ and the Grand Inquisitor, but a vastly daring change of pace for the atheist Lestat, a tormented Ivan Karamazov tied into spiritual knots and left disbelieving his own senses."
The fifth volume in the Vampire Lestat chronicles (The Tale of the Body Thief, etc.) finds Lestat pitted against the greatest adversaries of his bloody life: God and the Devil. Read full book review >

ROTTEN APPLES by Natasha Cooper
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: July 13, 1995

"Compelling moments, but no flow."
London civil servant Willow King, who writes romances as Cressida Woodruffe, is savoring married life with longtime lover Chief Inspector Tom Worth (Bitter Herbs, 1994, etc.) when she's asked by George Profettthe newly appointed minister for Rights and Chartersto investigate the suicide of art historian Fiona Fydgett. Read full book review >
AGAINST THE LAW by Michael C. Eberhardt
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: July 10, 1995

"Eberhardt (Body of a Crime, 1994) spins a series of coverups that spiral outward so wholeheartedlyeveryone's got something on everyone elsethat you're left with a pleasantly dizzy sense of paranoia yourself, as if the Hawaiian government had bugged your friendship lei. (Literary Guild selection)"
Hawaii governor Jim Slaton thinks he can appeal to both sovereignty activists and the big-ticket developers who've always buttered his bread. Read full book review >
ROSE MADDER by Stephen King
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 10, 1995

"Overwhelmingly uninventive — and if Liz Taylor does the audiobook, believe in miracles."
King's 30th novel (Insomnia, 1994, etc.) gets off to a careful, grand start but quickly turns to a half-pound of story to five pounds of stuffing, or tedium triumphant. Read full book review >
THE WITNESS by Sandra Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 5, 1995

"With identity puzzles and a chase, plus all the grue and woo: an entertainment bound for bestsellerdom. (First printing of ??; Literary Guild main selection; author tour)"
Brown's romantic suspense/adventures (Charade, 1994, etc.) are sharpening in pace and punch, as evidenced in this tale of a public defender, a young mother, who sees something unspeakable in the South Carolina woods. Read full book review >
SASHA'S TRICK by David Rosenbaum
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: July 5, 1995

"Even when he's a jerk, you'll find yourself pulling for Sasha. (Author tour)"
Second-novelist Rosenbaum (the Edgar-nominated Zaddik, 1993) returns with a tightly placed story of thieves, double-crosses, and the Russian mafia. Read full book review >
AFTER DARK by Phillip Margolin
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 1995

"Less crudely sensationalistic than Margolin's striking, overheated debut, but also less vigorously plotted, with a dewy- eyed view of legal lust that wouldn't fool a sleepy judge."
Second-novel blues for Margolin (Gone, But Not Forgotten, 1993): a murky, juiceless legal thriller in which lawyers hire lawyers when they're accused of killing other lawyers. Read full book review >
RIVER by Roderick Thorp
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: July 1, 1995

"Dark, windy, and thoroughly nasty, finally gathering the momentum of a train filled with a grotesque and horrific cargo. (First printing of 75,000)"
Thorp's latest blockbuster (Rainbow Drive, 1986, etc.) provides a fictional solution to the Green River murders that raged through the Pacific Northwest in the 1980's—and an explanation of why there was never any real-life solution to the 50-plus killings. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >