Thrillers Book Reviews (page 498)

SHOOT THE MOON by Joseph T. Klempner
THRILLERS
Released: Aug. 14, 1997

"Anybody who can overlook the just-for-my-sick-girl plea will enjoy watching Klempner (Felony Murder, 1995) rescue his hero as charmingly as Donald E. Westlake."
Think it would be fun to be sitting on top of something worth a cool $5 million? Read full book review >
KILLER MARKET by Margaret Maron
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 14, 1997

"An overplotted soufflÇ of a novel, puffed up to the sky with lethal doses of magnolia-scented gossip. (Author tour)"
North Carolina Circuit Court Judge Deborah Knott (Up Jumps the Devil, 1996, etc.) breezes into High Point just in time for the furniture industry's Market Week—a four-star production that features dazzling displays, nonstop parties, and no room at the inn for anybody who arrives, as Deborah does, without reservations. Read full book review >

DIGGER by Joseph Flynn
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 11, 1997

"Shamelessly melodramatic entertainment, though with a crude narrative power that will make most readers keep turning the pages."
Flynn's hardcover debut is an extravagant but oddly appealing blue-collar opera: amid constant touches of magic realism and in- your-face symbols, Vietnam vets join forces with union men and women to battle a corrupt industrialist. Read full book review >
KEY WITNESS by J.F. Freedman
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 4, 1997

"An intensely accomplished, smoothly written, character-driven page-turner that, for all its flaws, manages to push the right buttons while sustaining a high level of suspense and interest. (Literary Guild/Mystery Guild selection)"
Superior, improbable, but gripping postO.J. legal procedural that fearlessly plays well-worn race, sex, and psychokiller cards, and still wins the game. Read full book review >
MOTHER, MAY I SLEEP WITH DANGER? by Claire Rainwater Jacobs
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 4, 1997

"A bustling exercise in forestalling the obvious that's just the ticket for Mary Higgins Clark's less demanding fans."
Mom knows best when a daughter takes up with a guy who's wrong, wrong, wrong. Read full book review >

BRAIN DEAD by Eileen Dreyer
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"Filled with secrets and betrayals, solid medicine, smart-aleck chat—and likable sleuths. ($50,000 ad/promo; radio satellite tour)"
Romance author Dreyer (a.k.a Kathleen Korbel) debuts in hardcover with a galloping suspenser featuring a brace of wisecracking sleuths who turn up murder and shady dealings in the medical establishments of a small community. Read full book review >
SURVIVAL GAMES by Charles Gaines
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

An initially crisp and involving literary thriller, this first novel in 15 years by the author of, among others, Stay Hungry (not reviewed) and Dangler (1980) unfortunately devolves into a high- pitched and pretentious macho bloodbath. Read full book review >
RISING PHOENIX by Kyle Mills
THRILLERS
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"A chillingly effective and suspenseful tale, complete with the moral ambiguities and guilty pleasures of such vigilante dreams as Death Wish. ($300,000 ad/promo)"
In Mills's exceptionally accomplished debut thriller, a well- organized and generously financed vigilante group essays a final solution to America's festering drug problems. Read full book review >
FLAME WAR by Joshua Quittner
THRILLERS
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"Some fascinating cyber-scenes about how distinctive personality traits seep through the most impersonal computerized disguises, but abundantly clunky dialogue and cutesy asides stall the suspense."
Choppy, ditsy tale of a Gen-X slacker on the trail of a homicidal hacker who uses exploding floppy disks to eliminate fellow hackers who blunder through the ``back door'' of a data- encryption program. Read full book review >
CIMARRON ROSE by James Lee Burke
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"Even the ragged ends make other mystery novels look anemic."
You can take Burke out of Louisiana's Iberia Parish (Cadillac Jukebox, 1996, etc.), but you can't take Iberia out of Burke, as this tangled tale of Texas murder and memory makes wondrously clear. Read full book review >
MONSTRUM by Donald James
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"A bleak but engrossing tale whose impact owes much to the author's skill at conveying the horrific details of a future-shock domain that's neither East nor West but sui generis. (First printing of 100,000)"
An effectively moody murder mystery—and more—set in 21st- century Russia, from the versatile James (The House of Janus, 1990, etc.). Read full book review >
OBSTRUCTION OF JUSTICE by Perri O’Shaughnessy
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1997

"Forced, unconvincing characters and vastly overheated plotting, with some sharp, if predictable, courtroom scenes and an impressive knowledge of forensic pathology."
Third, and weakest, in a legal procedural whodunit series featuring Lake Tahoe attorney Nina Reilly from the O'Shaughnessy sisters writing team. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Clinton Kelly
January 9, 2017

Bestselling author and television host Clinton Kelly’s memoir I Hate Everyone Except You is a candid, deliciously snarky collection of essays about his journey from awkward kid to slightly-less-awkward adult. Clinton Kelly is probably best known for teaching women how to make their butts look smaller. But in I Hate Everyone, Except You, he reveals some heretofore-unknown secrets about himself, like that he’s a finicky connoisseur of 1980s pornography, a disillusioned critic of New Jersey’s premier water parks, and perhaps the world’s least enthused high-school commencement speaker. Whether he’s throwing his baby sister in the air to jumpstart her cheerleading career or heroically rescuing his best friend from death by mud bath, Clinton leaps life’s social hurdles with aplomb. With his signature wit, he shares his unique ability to navigate the stickiest of situations, like deciding whether it’s acceptable to eat chicken wings with a fork on live television (spoiler: it’s not). “A thoroughly light and entertaining memoir,” our critic writes. View video >