Thrillers Book Reviews (page 498)

STRANGE THINGS AND STRANGER PLACES by Ramsey Campbell
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 1993

"With so much Campbell to read or reread, only die-hard fans will want to bother with these scrappy leavings."
A middle-drawer miscellany—eight stories and two novellas- -that spans the 20-year career of British horror-writer Campbell. Read full book review >
NEVER SEND FLOWERS by John E. Gardner
THRILLERS
Released: May 31, 1993

"As Gardner struggles to update the perils his superstar hero faces, Bond himself remains the biggest anachronism of all."
Like Pentagon dinosaurs laboring to adapt to a new world order by finding telltale traces of the old in every dark shadow, Gardner's reincarnation of James Bond examines a string of serial killings and finds a freelance terrorist just as dangerous as his old adversaries from SMERSH and SPECTRE. Read full book review >

CROSSING BY NIGHT by David Aaron
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 21, 1993

"Aaron's best yet."
Grand espionage-adventure at the dawn of WW II, with the lovely wrinkle that the spy is a woman: American-born Elizabeth Pack, whose real-life exploits on behalf of the British take on stirring fictional form courtesy of Aaron (Agent of Influence, 1988, etc.) Read full book review >
KALEIDOSCOPE EYES by Graham Watkins
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: May 14, 1993

"Worth a try, though it might be wise to call it quits after the hot chili peppers."
Sadomasochistic shivers about an incarnate Aztec goddess and the spell she casts over six North Carolina yuppies. Read full book review >
THE VANISHING by Tim Krabbé
THRILLERS
Released: May 10, 1993

"For connoisseurs of intellectual horror."
This austere and cinematic Dutch novella (published abroad in 1984 as The Golden Egg) is KrabbÇ's first US appearance but has already served as the basis for two movies directed by George Sluizer: a 1988 version in Dutch, which has all the chilling, obsessive focus of the book; and an American remake, which recently bombed at the box office, even though the director softened the nightmarish aspects of its two sources. Read full book review >

I'LL BE SEEING YOU by Mary Higgins Clark
THRILLERS
Released: May 5, 1993

"But nobody will care. (Literary Guild Triple Selection for July)"
Welcome back to Clarkland, where the menace to young womanhood is piled on as thick as whipped cream, and where, this time, a TV reporter's investigation of a nefarious fertility clinic—and of her own family—is provoked by the street murder of a woman who looks like her identical twin. Read full book review >
SHADOW PLAY by Frances Fyfield
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: May 1, 1993

"Fyfield's intelligence is as ferociously penetrating as ever- -unhappy Rose is particularly well-drawn—but there's barely enough action here to keep the pot simmering while waiting for Mr. Logo's plausible maleficence to bring it to a boil."
Crown Prosecutor Helen West (Deep Sleep, 1992, etc.) takes time out from her repeated attempts to convict a chronic stalker of schoolgirls called Mr. Logo to befriend Rose Darvey, an angry, compulsively promiscuous case clerk in her office, when she runs into her at a pregnancy clinic—not realizing that Rose has a surprisingly long-standing connection with Margaret Mellors, oh-so-proper Mr. Logo's next-door neighbor and surrogate mother, a connection that's about to bear fatal fruit. Read full book review >
DR. HAGGARD'S DISEASE by Patrick McGrath
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1993

"An unbearably memorable ending lifts this to classic level while the thin bright nerves of the storyline are padded with magnificent surgical detail, hospital lore, and moods you can rub your finger down."
McGrath carries on his winning streak in the short horror novel form (Spider, 1990; The Grotesque, 1989; Blood and Water and Other Tales, 1987). Dr. Haggard's disease is sexual passion, and the story of its ravages is told in flashback as the crippled hero pieces it out to the heroine's son James, an RAF pilot. Read full book review >
NIGHTFALL by Katharine Marlowe
THRILLERS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Easy-going, moderate suspense."
Mildly involving suspense in which a high-school teacher is harassed by an obsessed student, himself the victim of parental neglect and abuse. Read full book review >
KNIGHT'S CROSS by E.M. Nathanson
THRILLERS
Released: May 1, 1993

The author of A Dirty Distant War (1987), etc., teams up with a career soldier/spy on a thriller about a top-secret OSS effort to round up Hitler and his cronies before they can commit suicide or otherwise escape the crashing Third Reich. Read full book review >
BROTHERS by Michael Bar-Zohar
THRILLERS
Released: May 1, 1993

"Ah, well, boys will be boys."
Amazing but true: the major upheavals in Soviet-American policy from the Cuban missile crisis to the abortive coup against Gorbachev were all sparked by a monstrous sibling rivalry between two half- brothers, raised half a world apart. Read full book review >
FISHBOY by Mark Richard
THRILLERS
Released: May 1, 1993

The promise of Richard's story collection The Ice at the Bottom of the World (which won the 1990 PEN/Hemingway Award) is only fitfully apparent in his surrealistic first novel about a boy and his first sea voyage. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nelson DeMille
author of RADIANT ANGEL
May 26, 2015

After a showdown with the notorious Yemeni terrorist known as The Panther, in Nelson DeMille’s latest suspense novel Radiant Angel, NYPD detective John Corey has left the Anti-Terrorist Task Force and returned home to New York City, taking a job with the Diplomatic Surveillance Group. Although Corey's new assignment with the DSG-surveilling Russian diplomats working at the U.N. Mission-is thought to be "a quiet end," he is more than happy to be out from under the thumb of the FBI and free from the bureaucracy of office life. But Corey realizes something the U.S. government doesn't: The all-too-real threat of a newly resurgent Russia. “Perfect summer beach reading, with or without margaritas, full of Glock-and-boat action,” our reviewer writes. View video >