Thrillers Book Reviews (page 500)

SPEAK NO EVIL by Rochelle Majer Krich
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Feb. 6, 1996

"A satisfyingly sturdy yarn—all wool and a yard wide—for Faye Kellerman fans and other right-minded enemies of rapists and vigilantes."
A criminal attorney is threatened with death if she wins her first big case. Read full book review >
VALENTINE by Tom Savage
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 5, 1996

"A stylish literary entertainment in which the resourceful Savage plays completely fair (or almost) with readers impatient for an immediate solution to his crafty puzzle."
Another slick if divinable suspenser from Savage (Precipice, 1994), Greenwich Village-set, in which a psychopath with a grudge stalks a young mystery writer. Read full book review >

SHATTERING GLASS by Nancy-Gay Rotstein
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"A strange, unsatisfying, inconclusive story that doesn't manage to rise beyond its apparent message that contemporary woman can't be happy."
Lawyer, poet, and first-novelist Rotstein puts plot on the back burner as the lives of three unrelated women—detailed in three separate sections—intersect in Itaro, Italy. Read full book review >
PRIMARY COLORS by Anonymous
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"Mystery insider's view or not, this is a delicious gift for your friends who still believe that politics and politicians have the answers."
A marvelously down-and-dirty chronicle of a presidential campaign that will make your eyes water, and some more famous eyes burn, in recognition. Read full book review >
MASQUERADE by Gayle Lynds
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"A tedious would-be thriller that quickly shows itself to be a sheep in wolf's clothing. (Author tour)"
An overlong, tiresome debut from erstwhile think-tank editor Lynds. Read full book review >

A MAN TO SLAY DRAGONS by Meagan McKinney
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"A mish-mash of settings, characters you've met before, a motivationless killer—and a quick, fun, silly pleasure to read."
Historical-romancer McKinney (Fair is the Rose, 1993) sets her first contemporary story—flimsy and fast-paced—in the crime- obsessed present. Read full book review >
NURSES by Marcia Rose
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"Nary an insight into the gritty reality of clinic life, but plenty of strong-willed nurses for the '90s, and satisfying supply- room trysts."
A fast-paced, unabashedly soap-operatic tale of love and betrayal in a hectic Manhattan clinic, the latest from the author of Like Mother, Like Daughter (1994), etc. Marty Lamb, Director of Community Care Clinics at All Souls Women's Hospital, is a superwoman with more than just one proverbial skeleton in her closet: a long-forgotten affair with a doctor (Paul), for example, who's also just been hired at CCC and an insane husband who's been locked away for eight years. Read full book review >
TREMOR by Winston Graham
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"Deliberate and old-fashioned storytelling—the good, patient, rewarding kind."
A curiously mundane title for an acutely observed novel of manners cum thriller: the prolific Graham (Stephanie, 1993, etc.) showcases a commanding grasp of human foibles and yearnings, as well as an appetite for—literally—earthshaking coincidences. Read full book review >
MOUNT DRAGON by Douglas Preston
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"Didactic at times, but, still, the thrillfest runs full-force to (almost) the very last page. (Author tour)"
Following fast on the heels of 1995's Relic—the scariest thriller ever set in the American Museum of Natural History— dynamic duo Douglas and Child once again demonstrate their mastery of the genre, this time hopping the killer-virus bandwagon to evoke plenty of healthy bioparanoia. Read full book review >
HOW TO MUTATE AND TAKE OVER THE WORLD by R.U. Sirius
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

A typographical mess of a book that tries hard to capture (and capitalize on) a fringe cultural phenomena—the lively underground anarchy of the Internet. Read full book review >
A PERSONAL HISTORY OF THIRST by John Burdett
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"Still, his unblinking eye—his characters are sketched in with great shrewdness — and his exact, resonant style make one hope that next time he'll rely less on surprise, more on narrative."
``You never get free. Read full book review >
STAINLESS by Todd Grimson
THRILLERS
Released: Feb. 1, 1996

"An erotic confetti-shower that leaves you thrilled and unclean."
``When I'm dead, there'll be no stain on our love,'' Garbo tells Armand as her eyes close forever in Camille, and much the same can be said by Justine, the fated vampiress here, as she and her human lover, Keith, go up in a Leibestod of sunlight and darkness. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Fernanda Santos
author of THE FIRE LINE
May 17, 2016

When a bolt of lightning ignited a hilltop in the sleepy town of Yarnell, Arizona, in June 2013, setting off a blaze that would grow into one of the deadliest fires in American history, the 20 men who made up the Granite Mountain Hotshots sprang into action. New York Times writer Fernanda Santos’ debut book The Fire Line is the story of the fire and the Hotshots’ attempts to extinguish it. An elite crew trained to combat the most challenging wildfires, the Hotshots were a ragtag family, crisscrossing the American West and wherever else the fires took them. There's Eric Marsh, their devoted and demanding superintendent who turned his own personal demons into lessons he used to mold, train and guide his crew; Jesse Steed, their captain, a former Marine, a beast on the fire line and a family man who wasn’t afraid to say “I love you” to the firemen he led; Andrew Ashcraft, a team leader still in his 20s who struggled to balance his love for his beautiful wife and four children and his passion for fighting wildfires. We see this band of brothers at work, at play and at home, until a fire that burned in their own backyards leads to a national tragedy. View video >