Thrillers Book Reviews (page 500)

ELECT MR. ROBINSON FOR A BETTER WORLD by Donald Antrim
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"But Antrim's failure to orchestrate his flashy set-pieces leaves the impression of a first draft, albeit from a promising new talent with a wonderfully keen ear. (First serial to Harper's and The Paris Review.)"
Civilization's thin crust tears again. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"Stories that mostly manage to be otherworldly and strange without turning into horror fiction or mere trots."
A first collection of 11 short stories, many with a Rod Serling-like twist, together with an introduction by Spencer (Maybe I'll Call Anna, 199) that laments the present-tense minimalist state of the literary short story. ``The Return of Count Electric'' is about a narrator who searches in his father's house for a death machine, thinking his father is a serial murderer; instead, he discovers that he himself is the murderer and, once he remembers, begins again his career of crime. ``The Wedding Photographer in Crisis'' concerns a Bill Murray kind of guy who forces a groom to go through with the wedding and films the bride topless. Read full book review >

THE YEAR'S BEST FANTASY AND HORROR by Ellen Datlow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 27, 1993

"Add on the various summations (Fantasy, Horror, TV and movies, obituaries, Honorable Mentions) and the result is another generous, appealing anthology, with much fine work and something to please all tastes."
Another colossal compendium, comprising 48 stories (although the late Angela Carter's ``Alice in Prague, or the Curious Room'' is included but not listed) and five poems (though two poems by Margaret Atwood are listed but not included). Read full book review >
THE LOST KEATS by Terence Faherty
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 19, 1993

"Less metaphysical intrigue than in last year's Live to Regret, but still this reflects Owen's attempts to reconcile his feelings with his actions—and it's told with the self-deprecating humor of Deadstick."
In August 1973, Owen Keane (in this prequel to Deadstick, 1991) is AR—At-Risk of dropping out—of a southern Indiana seminary when his spiritual advisor, Father Jerome, suggests that he look into the disappearance of his classmate Michael Crosley, who simply up and left the premises two weeks back. Read full book review >
SUMMER COOL by Al Sarrantonio
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 16, 1993

"Sleep well, America."
When her husband Bobby, a Yonkers cop, goes out for ice cream one hot night and never comes back—pausing in his flight only long enough to make an abusive 4 a.m. phone call and clean out their bank accounts—Terry Petty calls Bobby's old friend and former colleague, stargazing shamus Jack Paine (who debuted in Cold Night, 1989). Read full book review >

DREAMING IN COLOR by Charlotte Vale Allen
THRILLERS
Released: Aug. 15, 1993

"Topical and, oddly, commercially comfy."
Veteran novelist Allen (Leftover Dreams, 1992, etc.) now offers an ultimately feel-good tale about the successful rehabilitation of a severely battered woman who, with her child, is aided by three generations of women. Read full book review >
KILLINGS by A.W. Gray
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 5, 1993

"Shove over, Elmore Leonard."
White-haired, wild-eyed defender Bino Phillips (Bino, 1988) has pinned his hopes of getting coked-up football player Mickey Stanley acquitted of serious dealing on two witnesses—but one of them is dead, her body half drained of blood, and now the other has gone missing. Read full book review >
GUARDIAN by John Saul
THRILLERS
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Bound for bestsellerdom—like many of Saul's others."
Saul's 16th horror novel (Shadows, 1992, etc. etc.) finds the author in a less horrific, even speakable mode, since the pivotal plot device seems possible, if definitely unlikely. Read full book review >
THE LAST AERIE by Brian Lumley
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"Lumley's High Purple storytelling delirium remains undimmed."
Second novel in Lumley's Vampire World series (Blood Brothers, 1992), or subseries, but apparently seventh in the overall Necroscope series, each volume a doorstopper. Read full book review >
WAR BREAKER by Jim DeFelice
THRILLERS
Released: July 20, 1993

"There's some silly business about divine apparitions and amorous telepathy, but it's atoned for by the fresh new scenery."
A bankrupt ex-CIA agent takes his helicopter flying skills to the Indian subcontinent—where Muslim monarchists, Sikh separatists, and megalomaniac militarists are at daggers drawn. Read full book review >
CLOUDBURST by Ryne Douglas Pearson
THRILLERS
Released: July 16, 1993

"Newcomer Pearson ranges about smartly indeed with mind- boggling expertise."
Hyperreal whiz-bang first novel by a gifted high-tech specialist. Read full book review >
THE BRITANNIA CONTRACT by Paul Mann
THRILLERS
Released: July 15, 1993

"Grand summer reading—an outsized, perfectly realized thriller that doesn't carry any of Clancy's extra weight. (First printing of 50,000)"
Mann's bid at a Clancy-sized thriller has an elegantly simple premise. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jenny Han
July 6, 2015

In Jenny Han’s P.S. I Still Love You, Lara Jean didn’t expect to really fall for Peter. She and Peter were just pretending. Except suddenly they weren’t. Now Lara Jean is more confused than ever. When another boy from her past returns to her life, Lara Jean’s feelings for him return too. Can a girl be in love with two boys at once? In this charming and heartfelt sequel to the New York Times bestseller To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, we see first love through the eyes of the unforgettable Lara Jean. Love is never easy, but maybe that’s part of makes it so amazing. View video >