Thrillers Book Reviews (page 76)

RED TIDE by G.M. Ford
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: July 1, 2004

"If this case is a shade less riveting than Frank's first three (A Blind Eye, 2003, etc.), it's only because Ford allows his tough, impossibly idealistic hero to spend less time than he should facing those windmills head-on."
There are new dents and rents in Frank Corso's knightly clothing, but he battles the bad guys as hard as ever. Read full book review >
THE GHOST WRITER by John Harwood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2004

"A wonderful debut, evoking a century's worth of family history, by a multitalented and artistically ambidextrous newcomer."
A compulsively readable, sturdily plotted mystery set in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Here, the central importance of paintings, diaries, and ghosts lends the intrigue a distinctly Jamesian feel. Read full book review >

THE BALLAD OF THE LOW LIFES by Enrico Remmert
THRILLERS
Released: June 15, 2004

"Funny, fast-paced, and surprisingly good-natured: a nice romp through the thickets of good and evil. (N.B. Books to Film: The Italian film company RAI Cinema is currently in production with an adaptation of The Ballad of Low Lifes.)"
A caper about a trio of petty grifters in Turin who try to pull off the Big C (Con): second novel but first English translation. Read full book review >
OLD BOYS by Charles McCarry
THRILLERS
Released: June 15, 2004

"Excellent spy thriller in the Anglo-American style."
A collection of retired intelligence agents comes to the aid of the very dashing Christopher family of spies last seen in McCarry's 1991 Second Sight. Read full book review >
IN THE MOON OF RED PONIES by James Lee Burke
THRILLERS
Released: June 8, 2004

"Required reading for anybody who wonders whether mystery plotting has a future in mainstream fiction."
Wyatt Dixon, the psycho Billy Bob Holland put away forever in Bitterroot (2001), is back—but he's the least of Billy Bob's troubles this time. Read full book review >

THE HUNDREDTH MAN by Jack Kerley
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: June 1, 2004

"The whole story is told in prose as inventive as—well, as a fight to the death between embattled virtue and monstrous evil ought to be."
A serial killer novel with a difference: smartly written, densely plotted, and almost <\I>too clever<\I>. Read full book review >
DEAD LINES by Greg Bear
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2004

"The final close, though, is a quiet-as-dust epilogue."
The Big Sleep meets Dean Koontz in Bear's first big leap into mainstream fiction after a lifetime of high-grade SF (Darwin's Children, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >
THE TYRANT’S NOVEL by Thomas Keneally
THRILLERS
Released: June 1, 2004

"Brilliant, riveting, conscience-driven political novel: rank it with the greats."
Australia's Keneally (Office of Innocence, 2003, etc., etc.) offers the most significant American novel of some time, much as Graham Greene in 1955 with The Quiet American. Read full book review >
DOUBLE PLAY by Robert B. Parker
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 24, 2004

"The talk is electric, the pacing breakneck, the cast colorful and empathic. After a couple of so-so efforts, Parker flat out nails it here."
Ebbetts Field, 1947. Robinson's penciled in at first, a guy named Burke has his back, Parker benches Spenser (Back Story, 2000, etc.), and we get a gem of a book. Read full book review >
NOTHING LOST by John Gregory Dunne
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 16, 2004

"As angry, witty, and sweeping as The Bonfire of the Vanities."
Dunne's volcanic posthumous novel follows the circus surrounding a brutal torture killing of a saintly African-American laborer. Read full book review >
DEATH MATCH by Lincoln Child
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 11, 2004

"Terrific writing—though the climax, overly spun out, sticks to thriller format."
Second solo work by Child, who writes mighty thrillers with Douglas Preston (Still Life with Crows, 2003, etc.). Read full book review >
THE ENEMY by Lee Child
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: May 11, 2004

"Child has turned away from formulaic high-jinks to explore his characters instead: The result? His best so far."
The eighth Jack Reacher tale (Persuader, 2003, etc.) is a fabulously suspenseful prequel that reveals Reacher's character as he uncovers a homicidal cabal of military officers. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Vanessa Diffenbaugh
September 1, 2015

Vanessa Diffenbaugh is the New York Timesbestselling author of The Language of Flowers; her new novel, We Never Asked for Wings, is about young love, hard choices, and hope against all odds. For 14 years, Letty Espinosa has worked three jobs around San Francisco to make ends meet while her mother raised her children—Alex, now 15, and Luna, six—in their tiny apartment on a forgotten spit of wetlands near the bay. But now Letty’s parents are returning to Mexico, and Letty must step up and become a mother for the first time in her life. “Diffenbaugh’s latest confirms her gift for creating shrewd, sympathetic charmers,” our reviewer writes. View video >