Thrillers Book Reviews (page 76)

THE PROCEDURE by Harry Mulisch
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 2001

"Definitely not hammock reading. This is exhilarating, mind-bending stuff by an author who probes ever deeper into the mysteries that matter most—and keeps getting better."
The riddle of creation, and the innumerable natural and man-made shocks the overweening intellect is (so to speak) heir to, are the dominant concerns in this elusive and fascinating metaphysical fiction. Read full book review >
YONDER STANDS YOUR ORPHAN by Barry Hannah
THRILLERS
Released: July 1, 2001

"A sprawling, nearly plotless novel: Hannah shows quite authoritatively that he's still the master of his craft. The manufactured eccentricity of some of his recent short stories is absent here, but not his love of characters and language. A masterwork of southern beat terror gospel."
The first outing in a decade from the great southern roustabout (Never Die, 1991, etc.) goes on a long tear through the lives of a motley crew of misfits living around a giant lake in the backwoods of Mississippi. Read full book review >

BLACK OXEN by Elizabeth Knox
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 2001

"'Why are these people trying to teach the world about Taoscal magic?' The answers to this question, and many others, will be found by the diligent—and patient—reader, somewhere within the sprawling, infuriating pages of Black Oxen."
Byzantine intrigue and melodramatic excess abound to an almost unprecedented degree in this fascinating, inordinately busy new novel from the New Zealand author (The Vintner's Luck, 1999). Read full book review >
THE CHILDREN’S WAR by J.N. Stroyar
THRILLERS
Released: June 12, 2001

"Toweringly intelligent, with icy touches showing how all sides dehumanize to achieve their aims. Stylish, no, but a fierce picture of massive dystopian evil."
What if . . . the Third Reich had won WWII and, 50 years later, were still around, embracing Europe, allied with the USSR, and in a truce with the North American Union? It's still the same oppressive Third Reich, all its old horrors intact, but with endless underground movements bent on destroying it. Read full book review >
WITNESS FOR THE DEAD by Michael Fredrickson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"Fredrickson, a lawyer, knows his courtrooms, sure. But he also knows his people—and makes them interesting, believable, and often very funny."
Another literate, gripping legal thriller, by the author of the impressive A Cinderella Affidavit (1999). Read full book review >

THE HOTHOUSE by Wolfgang Koeppen
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"A rediscovered masterpiece. Norton is reissuing Koeppen's Death in Rome to accompany it. Let's hope a new edition of Pigeons on the Grass will follow soon thereafter."
The first English translation of an important German novel, first published in 1953, whose pointillist complexity offers a searing image of postwar Germany on the perilous threshold of partition and possible rearmament. Read full book review >
NUREMBERG: THE RECKONING by William F. Buckley Jr.
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2001

"Literate, absorbing, and thought-provoking. Buckley at his best."
The 15th novel by the conservative intellectual godfather and gadfly is a brainy thriller cut from the same cloth as Spytime (2000): fast-moving and based on historical events only all too real. Read full book review >
PASSAGE by Connie Willis
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 8, 2001

"Once again, Willis has developed an idea that bears all the authority of a genuine insight: disturbingly plausible, compelling, intensely moving, and ultimately uplifting."
New contemporary, near-mainstream outing for the celebrated author of To Say Nothing of the Dog (1997), etc. Joanna Lander, a clinical psychologist at Denver's Mercy General hospital, studies patients who've had Near Death Experiences (NDEs). Read full book review >
PEACEMAKER by Gordon Kent
THRILLERS
Released: May 1, 2001

"Heroes of both sexes to root for, deliciously corrupt villains to create anxiety: despite occasional forays into acronymic thickets, this rollicking, rousing naval thriller bears comparison to the genre's best."
A stirring sequel to Rules of Engagement (1999) from the pseudonymous Kent (a father and son writing team), with Navy intelligence officer Alan Craik back for some more of his special brand of derring-do. Read full book review >
ACROBAT by Gonzalo Lira
THRILLERS
Released: May 1, 2001

"Lira (Counterparts, 1998) is an edgy, energetic storyteller, and his spin on a well-worn genre has it frisking about almost as if newly minted."
It's not George Smiley's kind of spycraft, but it's complex enough and no less deadly. Read full book review >
SPY’S FATE by Arnaldo Correa
THRILLERS
Released: May 1, 2001

"Character-driven and consistently entertaining: the first US publication for storywriter and second-novelist Correa, 'considered one of the three founders of the Cuban crime-fiction genre.'"
From Cuba with panache, a rare English-language thriller, written with flair, authority, and admirable detachment, about intelligence operations grown soft. Read full book review >
WITHOUT FAIL by Lee Child
THRILLERS
Released: May 1, 2001

"Relentlessly suspenseful and unexpectedly timely: just the thing for Dick Cheney's bedside reading wherever he's keeping himself these days."
When the newly elected Vice President's life is threatened, the Secret Service runs to nomadic soldier-of-fortune Jack Reacher (Echo Burning, 2001, etc.) in this razor-sharp update of The Day of the Jackal and In the Line of Fire that's begging to be filmed. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Pierce Brown
author of GOLDEN SON
February 17, 2015

With shades of The Hunger Games, Ender’s Game, and Game of Thrones, Pierce Brown’s genre-defying Red Rising hit the ground running. The sequel, Golden Son, continues the saga of Darrow, a rebel battling to lead his oppressed people to freedom. As a Red, Darrow grew up working the mines deep beneath the surface of Mars, enduring backbreaking labor while dreaming of the better future he was building for his descendants. But the Society he faithfully served was built on lies. Darrow’s kind have been betrayed and denied by their elitist masters, the Golds—and their only path to liberation is revolution. “Stirring—and archetypal—stuff,” our reviewer writes. View video >