Thrillers Book Reviews (page 8)

THE BLUE by Lucy Clarke
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"Overall, it's quite a voyage."
Two women set sail on a yacht with a group of strangers hoping for a carefree, exotic adventure, but their journey takes an unsettling turn. Read full book review >
BLACK CHALK by Christopher J. Yates
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"You can't help but admire how Yates slowly unravels his players' safety nets—their minds—one roll of the dice at a time."
In Yates' debut, six college friends learn the hard way that games are never just games once they're made personal. Read full book review >

Justice for Mackenzie by Susan Stoker
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"More romance than thriller but enough of both to make this breezy read pure entertainment."
A Texas Ranger's newly discovered romance may be threatened by a serial killer who buries women alive in Stoker's (Protecting Jessyka, 2015, etc.) thriller, the first in a series. Read full book review >
Last Confession by D.C. Walker
Released: Aug. 4, 2015

"Men of God susceptible to human mistakes; profound, stimulating, and, best of all, entertaining."
In Walker (When the River Rises, 2015, etc.) and Dunbar's (Dungeons & Dragons: Legends of Baldur's Gate, Vol. 1, 2015, etc.) graphic novel/thriller, priests hoping to save a parish find a less than legitimate way to get the money, only to stir up a whirlwind of misdeeds and bad decisions. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 3, 2015

"Right off the bat, Tran displays the most admirable and worthwhile gift a serious thriller writer can have: compassion toward even the most disreputable of his characters."
A missing person mystery is delicately entwined with a heartbreaking story of migration and loss. Read full book review >

Naked Shall I Return by Christopher Bartley
Released: July 31, 2015

"An often entertaining novel featuring some humor and some mystery."
In the latest novel from Bartley (Every Secret Thing, 2014, etc.), the moral and cynical gangster Ross Duncan hunts for a Chinese antique with a long history in storied San Francisco.Read full book review >
PRETTY BABY by Mary Kubica
Released: July 28, 2015

"This book will give insomniacs a compelling reason to sit up all night."
Things go dangerously wrong when a middle-class wife and mother impulsively opens her home to a homeless teen and her tiny baby in Kubica's sophomore novel. Read full book review >
THE OTHER SON by Alexander Söderberg
Released: July 25, 2015

"A thriller with plenty of vectors but a better sense of direction than its predecessor."
A clearer picture of a fuzzy moral universe emerges in the middle of this thriller trilogy shot through with bad cops, good gangsters, and Scandinavian chill. Read full book review >
Zaphram, The Hidden Jewel by Gail Parker
Released: July 24, 2015

"A solid second entry, with more on the way."
A highly intelligent woman with superhuman powers and extensive combat training is kidnapped in order to help a team of terrorists find the world's greatest treasure in the sequel to Hidden 12, Intelligence Required (2014).Read full book review >
The Florida Caper by David Celley
Released: July 24, 2015

"Recovering loot becomes a madcap tale that delights in characters' illicit deeds."
In Celley's (Galvez Stadium, 2014, etc.) latest thriller, a man's search for his uncle's priceless stolen pendant necklace sparks dirty dealings, double-crossings, and murder.Read full book review >
THE DEVIL'S BAG MAN by Adam Mansbach
Released: July 21, 2015

"Books like Colson Whitehead's Zone One and Emily St. John Mandel's Station Eleven can keep their erudite social allegories—we'll be over here gobbling popcorn and waiting to see if Mansbach can keep this up."
Just the blood-soaked, demon-ravaged, terrifying sequel to The Dead Run (2013).Read full book review >
Tooth & Talon by James Lee
Released: July 20, 2015

"Eerie, entertaining tales whose recurring themes and characters make them stronger."
Vampires, otherworldly creatures, and human killers populate Lee's debut collection of horror and suspense stories. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >