Ivy League Killers by Dave Cherry

"Killers for hire make a surprisingly charming couple in this straightforward thriller."
In Cherry's (Sweep Rowing, 2014) novel, a young married couple share their love of rowing, spending time at the gun range, and handling contract killings for a covert organization. Read full book review >
Cape Deception by Eugene Nordstrom
Released: Aug. 5, 2015

"A top-notch mystery with ever escalating suspense and a satisfying payoff."
Old money is the target of a calculating stalker in this engrossing thriller. Read full book review >

Light by Paul Dale Anderson
Released: Sept. 11, 2015

"Renders spirits and the preternatural realm as tangible scenes of action and intensity."
The ghost of a murdered U.S. Army Ranger plans to thwart a plot to assassinate world leaders in Anderson's (Pinking Shears, 2015, etc.) supernatural thriller.Read full book review >
Sleight of Light by Allan V. Cotter
Released: June 4, 2015

"A crafty, quick-witted thriller that champions humanity over national boundaries."
In Cotter's debut thriller, a private eye clashes with an international cartel that has harnessed invisibility technology. Read full book review >
Zaphram, The Hidden Jewel by Gail Parker
Released: July 24, 2015

"A solid second entry, with more on the way."
A highly intelligent woman with superhuman powers and extensive combat training is kidnapped in order to help a team of terrorists find the world's greatest treasure in the sequel to Hidden 12, Intelligence Required (2014).Read full book review >

Reading the Streets by Michael Riley
Released: July 2, 2015

"A tense mystery that's concerned more with why than how."
In Riley's debut thriller, a West London detective inspector working a murder case gradually uncovers possible corruption among the authorities. Read full book review >
Maps, Legends and Misdemeanours by Kevin E. Hatt
Released: April 15, 2014

"The multiple plots don't always mesh or engage, but the central storyline will hook readers."
Searching for a rumored treasure puts a man and his friends in danger when an unknown party joins the hunt in the second of Hatt's (A Light in the Darkness, 2013, etc.) thriller series.Read full book review >
Prepare to Die by Susanne Kacsandi
Released: June 15, 2015

"A tightly controlled, entertaining religious adventure in which the downtrodden triumph with a little help from friends in the highest of places."
Kacsandi's debut is a religious thriller centering on human trafficking and sex slavery. Read full book review >
THE CROSSING by Michael Connelly
Released: Nov. 3, 2015

"Solid, unspectacular, utterly engrossing work from the reigning master of the police procedural."
Harry Bosch goes to work for the Lincoln lawyer. Read full book review >
Hunting Evil by Walt Branam
Released: July 17, 2015

"An entertaining tale bolstered by outstanding characters, both recurring and new."
Retired Army Ranger Tom Wolfe and wife Terry return to take down evil billionaire Vernon Crassman in Branam's (Alaska Gold, 2014) action-thriller.Read full book review >
Hidden12, Intelligence Required by Gail Parker
Released: Dec. 5, 2014

"Not much action for the first outing, but the start of what could be an invigorating series."
In Parker's debut thriller, a young woman learns that her estranged parents are genetically enhanced soldiers who have passed down unique abilities. Read full book review >
Wishing on the Water by Elizabeth York
Released: July 7, 2015

"Dramatic and twisty but full of plot holes; plus, the writer heroine isn't very writerly."
After her fiance dies, a woman tries to start over elsewhere, but a visit home stirs up both unresolved passion and new danger in this romance/thriller novel. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >