HUTS, HOVELS AND HOUSES by Timothy Fisher

HUTS, HOVELS AND HOUSES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The publishers tag this for ages twelve and up but the picture book format and some of the pictured builders look younger. The projects themselves range from simple play structures made of stacked soda cans, newspaper logs, milk carton building blocks, or palm branches bunched like a tipi to demanding stone and concrete building complete with foundation (""it must extend below your frostline""), framed-in doorway (""square and level it""), and wooden wall forms which are raised with jacks for each level of construction. For this house you can install paper partitions, running water (via plastic hose, if you are lucky enough to be downhill from a stream or spring), a windmill to generate electricity, insulation, and a ""solar heathag system"" consisting of a south window with rocks or water for heat storage. All of this requires more work and skill than the book's tone and appearance lead you to expect--though Fisher does warn that the stone house takes ""a great deal of backbreaking work."" The strong and committed teenager might manage handily on his directions--the early, easier projects appeal to an entirely different audience.

Pub Date: Sept. 15th, 1977
Publisher: Addison-Wesley