VILLAGE IN AUGUST by T'len Chun

VILLAGE IN AUGUST

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A modern Chinese classic in the making, this Manchurian For Whom the Bell Tolls Written by a youth of the people, it tells the people's story, and has rapidly become a virtual battlery of Chinese youth. Here is no story of the leaders of China's magnificent stand against the Japanese, but a saga of a little band of guerilla fighters, under-cutting the victorious Japanese and the bootlicking natives of captured Manchuria, in much the same way that Hemingway pictures his guerilla loyalists in the heart of Franco's territory, fighting a hopeless battle for what it can do to bolster the hopes and promises of future survival of freedom. There's -- as Edgar Snow says in his introduction -- a Rabelaisian quality, of lust and humor and earthiness, but -- as in Hemingway, in Steinback, it is an integral part of the people, the humble peasants, the small tradesmen, the villagers, who make up the little band. Not a novel -- though there is romance here; not straight adventure, though that is there too. Just a slice of life, in the round. One is made to feel a part of the guerilla group, their thoughts, their deeds.

Pub Date: March 30th, 1942
Publisher: Smith & Durrell