SEVEN DAYS TO PETROGRAD by Tom Hyman

SEVEN DAYS TO PETROGRAD

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Here, Hyman (Riches and Honor, 1985; The Russian Woman, 1983) knits Bolshevik revolution and White House bungling into a thriller about a German plot to put Lenin in power--and a British effort to keep the Russians in the First World War. Arthur Zimmerman, the Kaiser's foreign minister, has come up with a plan to break the stalemate in the war with England. With the assistance of an obese Danish arms merchant, he arranges for the exiled V.I. Lenin to round up his supporters and return to Petrograd, traveling through Germany with the secret cooperation of the German government. Lenin's side of the bargain is to pull Russia out of the war as soon as he seizes power, freeing the Germans to concentrate on the western front. But even as Lenin buys in, the British get wind of the plot and hire American trouble-shooter Harry Bauer to see that the revolutionary hero never makes it out of Germany alive. Bauer--whose thanks for a recent bit of dirty work on behalf of the Americans was a nearly successful attempt on his life--reluctantly agrees, figures out how to disguise himself as a revolutionary, and gets on board Lenin's train. Even before Harry can get his operation underway, he runs into American sabotage, thanks to the pious President Wilson, who wants no part of illegal high jinks. But resourceful Harry Bauer is not about to abandon the job, even though everyone from the Germans to the British who hired him want him off the train before he rewrites history. Fast-moving fun.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 1987
Publisher: Viking