FREEDOM AND AFTER by Tom Mboya

FREEDOM AND AFTER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Tom Mboya of Kenya is certainly one of the most interesting as well as most promising young statesmen in Africa today. One might think that writing autobiography at the age of thirty-three is rushing things a bit, but Mr. Mboya has done and seen so very much of national and international consequence in the past decade that his readers will only wish he had written twice as much as he has here. His principal subjects, after a much-too-brief account of his childhood and education, are: his role in African trade unions; Mau Mau Jomo Kenyatta, and the question of violence in nationalist movements; the crucial roles of students and women; the neocolonialist dangers; the future of the Commonwealth; Pan-Africanism; and the politics and morality of neutralism. Readers who lack some rather detailed understanding of recent African history may encounter difficulty with the alphabet soup of party, union, and conference names, but Mr. Mboya's unrhetorical sincerity and simple, honest language mark this volume as one of the very best--quite possibly the best--which has so far appeared from the African side of the ""African question"".

Publisher: Little, Brown