TOMIE DePAOLA'S BOOK OF BIBLE STORIES

A selection of the best. known stories from the Creation to the Resurrection, nicely rounded by concluding with 1 Corinthians 13 and a psalm of praise. DePaola uses an accessible new translation, the New International Version (c1973-1984) without abridgement—an excellent choice fox introducing these favorite texts to young children. The illustrations, in dePaola's usual rhythmic, decorative style, have even more grace and simplicity than usual, the absence of detail leaving imaginations unfettered by trivia. The artist avoids the most harrowing moments: Abraham has already turned to the angel who stops him from slaying his son; the Crucifixion is seen at a distance, and from the back. Adam and Eve are posed with extraordinary modesty. Curiously, Joseph is omitted altogether. A great many of dePaola's characters continue to walk around with their eyes closed. Still, a handsome volume that will be welcome in homes, churches, and schools. Index to Bible texts.

Pub Date: Sept. 27, 1990

ISBN: 0-399-21690-1

Page Count: 128

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 15, 1990

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Fans of this popular series will find this a rewarding addition to family Easter celebrations.

GOD GAVE US EASTER

From the God Gave Us You series

Bergren and Bryant attempt to explain Easter to young children in a gentle, nonthreatening manner, with partial success.

When Little Cub questions her father about Easter, Papa Bear explains the religious significance of the holiday in various symbolic ways to his cub. He uses familiar things from their world, such as an egg and a fallen tree, to draw parallels with aspects of the Christian story. Papa Bear discusses his close relationships with Jesus and God, encouraging Little Cub to communicate with God on her own. The theme focuses on the renewal of life and the positive aspects of loving God and Jesus. Easter is presented as a celebration of eternal life, but the story skirts the issue of the crucifixion entirely. Some adults will find this an inadequate or even dishonest approach to the Easter story, but others will appreciate the calm and soothing text as a way to begin to understand a difficult subject. Bryant’s charming watercolor illustrations of the polar bear family, their cozy home and snowy forest scenes add to the overall mellow effect.

Fans of this popular series will find this a rewarding addition to family Easter celebrations. (Religion/picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Jan. 15, 2013

ISBN: 978-0-307-73072-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: WaterBrook

Review Posted Online: Dec. 12, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2013

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THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE

From the Chronicles of Narnia series , Vol. 1

Although metaphysical rumblings may disturb adults, this wily symbolism-studded fantasy should appeal to children of an imaginative turn. While exploring an old English mansion, the four children—Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy—discover through passing into a wardrobe, the strange land of Narnia, where it is winter without ever becoming Christmas. The children soon are swept up in the terror of the rule of the White Witch, fighting with the other subjects—all animals—and the glorious Lion, Asian, who brings spring and hope with him. In spite of the White Witch's terrific enslavement of Edmund, her horrid power, which changes living things to stone, and the sacrificial death of Aslan, the forces of light win, the children are made kings and queens, and Asian returns to life. The plot thickens to a pretty heavy pudding at the end, but the prose is witty and the novel action is fast-moving. Not recommended for adults!

Pub Date: Nov. 6, 1950

ISBN: 978-0-06-171505-1

Page Count: -

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: April 9, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1950

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