DOG DAYS AT THE WHITE HOUSE: The Outrageous Memoirs of the Presidential Kennel Keeper by Traphes & Frances Spatz Leighton Bryant

DOG DAYS AT THE WHITE HOUSE: The Outrageous Memoirs of the Presidential Kennel Keeper

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Outrageous they are. Bryant, the Earl Wilson of the White House, a staff electrician, was invited by Kennedy to take charge of the Presidential dogs, a job he continued through the Nixon years. Bryant has gossip to peddle and he does it with relish: in-house whoopee with JFK (nude women padding about) while Jackie was away; LBJ scatology and gut-twisting control of his staff; and Nixon, nervous with people and dogs (he was crushed when his sedate Irish setter, King Timahoe, wouldn't shake hands with him). Bryant discourses on Presidential marriages: the Kennedys were happy in their fashion; Lady Bird's motto--quoted from an unnamed source--seemed to be ""You can play with Lyndon but you can't take him home with you""; and there was little warmth between Dick and Pat. Bryant liked Truman; JFK; was alternately intimidated by and attracted to LBJ; disliked Ike and Nixon. As for the dogs, with the exception of Nixon's polite setter, they were a wild bunch--carpet tearers, given to sudden evacuations and voidings on people and places, flea-and-worm-ridden, and LBJ's flaked-out collie Blanco was usually on tranquilizers. But as Bryant points out, the White House ruins dogs and children. A shovel full of steamy stuff--if you're fastidious, bring along some sawdust.

Pub Date: July 17th, 1975
Publisher: Macmillan