True Crime Book Reviews (page 10)

Released: June 16, 2015

"An intriguing but minor testament to the persistence of old-school military espionage."
The story of a millennial who became an informant for the FBI. Read full book review >
Released: June 9, 2015

"Intriguing but lacking the salacious detail and hard evidence necessary for true fascination."
An attempt to introduce the world to a female spy far more successful than Mata Hari and just as captivating. Read full book review >

Released: June 9, 2015

"An eye-opener and an excellent job of reporting and writing. The only drawback will be the dawning realization that as bad as the three stoners were, the government is sanctioning far worse in its zeal for secrecy and deniability."
Or, the gang that couldn't scam straight. Read full book review >
Released: June 9, 2015

"Tragic, gripping, and authentic, this book deserves a wide audience."
An investigation into the plague of violence engulfing a generation of American youth. Read full book review >
Released: June 2, 2015

"A fast-moving and readable yet unsurprising tale of wealth and power in the new Russia."
The rise and fall of a single oligarch as a gaudy microcosm of post-communist Russia. Read full book review >

90 CHURCH by Dean Unkefer
Released: June 2, 2015

"Though entertainingly readable in a grimy sort of way, this is more a tangle of sex, violence, and betrayal than a serious true-crime narrative about this little-discussed era."
A grim, fevered memoir of pre-Drug Enforcement Administration anti-drug warriors raising havoc in New York City. Read full book review >
Released: June 2, 2015

"An avuncular account of a life spent uncovering deception for the CIA."
Memoir from a veteran of the arcane specialty of covert polygraph espionage interrogations. Read full book review >
MOB COP by Fred Pascente
Released: June 1, 2015

"Not exactly a self-portrait of a criminal mastermind, but a somewhat worthwhile glimpse into the schizoid world of a corrupt cop."
A former crooked cop looks back on his conflict-of-interest life as a policeman and midlevel grifter. Read full book review >
Released: May 19, 2015

"A highly readable, entertaining story offering a solid education for anyone lacking scruples and wanting to make money. Surely Bernie Madoff studied Koretz's methods."
The granddaddy of all con men, Leo Koretz (1881-1925), gives Jobb (Journalism/Univ. of King's Coll., Halifax; The Cajuns: A People's Story of Exile and Triumph, 2005) the opportunity to exhibit his impressive research and storytelling skills.Read full book review >
CRIMINAL THAT I AM by Jennifer Ridha
Released: May 12, 2015

"Acknowledging the balance between her heart and head, Ridha amply demonstrates what can happen when the balance is upset."
Defending the son of a famous actor, a defense attorney finds herself entangled in the case emotionally as well as legally. Read full book review >
Released: May 5, 2015

"Other than spies, this book has little in common with spy thrillers, but it's just as captivating."
The uncommon family business of selling information to Russia proves exciting, lucrative and remarkably misguided. Read full book review >
The Golden Arrow by Lloyd Richardson
Released: April 30, 2015

"A sound sophomore effort with enough espionage fuel to power a future entry in the series."
Two intelligence agents from the United States and India, respectively, work together to stop Iran from launching a nuclear missile at Israel in Richardson's (Dragon's Paw, 2012) political thriller. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
H.W. Brands
October 11, 2016

As noted historian H.W. Brands reveals in his new book The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, at the height of the Korean War, President Harry S. Truman committed a gaffe that sent shock waves around the world. When asked by a reporter about the possible use of atomic weapons in response to China's entry into the war, Truman replied testily, "The military commander in the field will have charge of the use of the weapons, as he always has." This suggested that General Douglas MacArthur, the willful, fearless, and highly decorated commander of the American and U.N. forces, had his finger on the nuclear trigger. A correction quickly followed, but the damage was done; two visions for America's path forward were clearly in opposition, and one man would have to make way. Truman was one of the most unpopular presidents in American history. General MacArthur, by contrast, was incredibly popular, as untouchable as any officer has ever been in America. The contest of wills between these two titanic characters unfolds against the turbulent backdrop of a faraway war and terrors conjured at home by Joseph McCarthy. “An exciting, well-written comparison study of two American leaders at loggerheads during the Korean War crisis,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >