True Crime Book Reviews (page 2)

A GOOD MONTH FOR MURDER by Del Quentin Wilber
TRUE CRIME
Released: June 7, 2016

"Readable, appealing true crime with an undercurrent of unease at the violence creeping into so many postindustrial 'edge city' communities."
Propulsive account of a hard-charging homicide unit in a high-crime Washington, D.C., suburb. Read full book review >
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: June 1, 2016

"First-rate reporting and a seminar in how to employ context in investigative and historical journalism."
A veteran journalist uses a variety of lenses to illuminate the dark story of the Black Legion, an association of murderous (white) domestic terrorists who briefly thrived in the upper Midwest. Read full book review >

WHITE RAGE by Carol Anderson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 31, 2016

"A book that provides necessary perspective on the racial conflagrations in the U.S."
A close reading of America's racial chasm. Read full book review >
JANE DOE JANUARY by Emily Winslow
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 24, 2016

"A potently rendered chronicle of rape and the clarity and closure achieved even when justice is only partially served."
The story of a Pennsylvania serial rapist who stood trial two decades after his assault on the author. Read full book review >
ONCE A COP by Corey Pegues
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 24, 2016

"A gritty, straightforward memoir about corrective determination written from both sides of the law."
A Queens native recounts his evolution from drug dealer to decorated veteran police officer. Read full book review >

THE BOYS IN THE BUNKHOUSE by Dan Barry
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"Gently, empathetically, and indelibly, Barry conveys a tale of unthinkable brutality."
A gripping indictment of society's treatment of "losers." Read full book review >
THE NAZI HUNTERS by Andrew Nagorski
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"Packed with the tangled, riveting detail of the many cases, this is more sensational reading than astute legal analysis—but absorbing nonetheless."
A detailed look at the grim work of tracking Nazis over the decades since World War II. Read full book review >
RAIF BADAWI, THE VOICE OF FREEDOM by Ensaf Haidar
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 17, 2016

"A sobering exposé of Saudi Arabian culture and a tribute to the courage and strength of both the author and her husband."
In a slim volume originally published in Germany last year, the wife of imprisoned human rights activist Raif Badawi keeps her husband's plight in the public eye. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 10, 2016

"A vivid, compelling account of a life on the edge."
The mother of the 18-year-old killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014 relates the saga of her life in the St. Louis suburb, expressing her love for her children on nearly every page. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: May 9, 2016

"Those whose politics differ from Hinton's will likely be inclined to quarrel with her diagnosis, but they'll be obliged to grapple with her fact-filled, scholarly argument."
A Harvard historian examines the origins of "the foremost civil rights issue of our time." Read full book review >
THE COOK UP by D. Watkins
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A familiar story to fans of The Wire, but Watkins provides a gritty, vivid first-person document of a desperate demographic."
A memoir of growing up and selling drugs on East Baltimore's bloody corners. Read full book review >
MISSING MAN by Barry Meier
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2016

"A chilling real-world espionage yarn."
The unsettling tale of Bob Levinson, a private investigator gone missing in Iran. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >