True Crime Book Reviews (page 5)

RED NOTICE by Bill Browder
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"It may be that 'Russian stories never have happy endings,' but Browder's account more than compensates by ferociously unmasking Putin's thugocracy."
An American-born financier spins an almost unbelievable tale of the "poisoned" psychology afflicting business life in Vladimir Putin's Russia. Read full book review >
GHETTOSIDE by Jill Leovy
Released: Jan. 27, 2015

"A sobering and informative look at the realities of criminality in the inner city."
Los Angeles Times reporter and editor Leovy looks at the thinly veiled racist origins of violence in South Central LA. Read full book review >

MURDER AT CAMP DELTA by Joseph Hickman
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"A plainly told, unsettling corrective to the many jingoistic accounts of post-9/11 military action."
Disturbing account of abuse and secrecy at the Guantánamo Bay military prison, tied to the deaths of three detainees. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 13, 2015

"An eye-opening story of evil in a holy place."
The long-hidden story of the ultimate convent scandal, masterfully retold. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"The fascinating story of a once-invincible man 'who has made the best of the cards that life has dealt him but…revealed himself to possess to an equally extreme degree the insecurities that all are prey to.'"
An engaging biography of the Olympic sprinter and convicted killer we thought we knew. Read full book review >

Released: Nov. 28, 2014

"Weaving a tale that is simultaneously about race, failed systems, money, sex, family and simple rage, Safran truly did lose a year in Mississippi, and getting lost with him is a joy."
A murdered white supremacist sparks a remarkable investigation that is anything but straightforward. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 18, 2014

"A clumsy account about a tragic collision in which justice seems already to have been served."
Memoir of time spent with a deeply unpleasant and, in the end, murderous mogul. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 15, 2014

"A thoroughgoing but occasionally plodding story that awaits a better writer. For now, though, this is the best available account of a crime that, though a cold case, still has people talking."
An examination of the spasm of violence popularly dubbed the "Texarkana moonlight murders." Read full book review >
HELL-BENT by Jason Ryan
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"Without well-known criminal names or impressive crimes to pull an audience in, this will likely appeal only to Mafia buffs."
Ryan (Jackpot: High Times, High Seas, and the Sting that Launched the War on Drugs, 2011) delivers his second true-crime tale, this time covering "Hawaii's underworld."Read full book review >
TOO BIG TO JAIL by Brandon L. Garrett
Released: Nov. 1, 2014

"Garrett combines groundbreaking research with clear writing and moral outrage."
Garrett (Law/Univ. of Virginia; Convicting the Innocent: Where Criminal Prosecutions Go Wrong, 2011, etc.) presents research on criminal behavior by corporations in the United States and overseas. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"A wild, well-told tale."
A colorful account of reform efforts to eradicate sin, corruption and violence in early-20th-century New Orleans. Read full book review >
JUST MERCY by Bryan Stevenson
Released: Oct. 21, 2014

"Emotionally profound, necessary reading."
A distinguished NYU law professor and MacArthur grant recipient offers the compelling story of the legal practice he founded to protect the rights of people on the margins of American society. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >