True Crime Book Reviews (page 57)

HISTORY
Released: July 1, 1995

"Effectively executed, but a repulsive story nonetheless."
Gut-wrenching account of a brutal 1988 rape/murder in Louisville, Ky., and the miscarriage of justice that resulted when killer's prosecution was botched. Read full book review >
TRUE CRIME
Released: June 19, 1995

"A riveting though slightly simplistic story of crime and punishment, mental illness, and mother love. (8 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
The Pulitzer Prizewinning team of Naifeh and Smith (Jackson Pollock, 1990, etc.) collaborate on this haunting, compulsively readable account of how a ``typical'' middle-class family produced a serial rapist and murderer. Read full book review >

CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: June 1, 1995

"Common-sense talk in a debate characterized by demagoguery."
A tonic exploration of the notorious Willie Horton case and the ``politics of fear'' that has hindered American justice. Read full book review >
CHANGE OF CIRCUMSTANCE by Candida Lawrence
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: May 31, 1995

"These revelations challenge credulity, but they remain relevant due to the persistent newspaper headlines over vicious custody battles."
An autobiographical saga by a pseudonymous woman who kidnaps her children from their father and escapes with them into hiding. Read full book review >
OSWALD'S TALE by Norman Mailer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 1995

"Judicious, painstaking, and imaginative, this should be a central book in a growing and undependable canon."
Mailer subtly exercises his novelist's imagination and expends considerable journalistic shoe-leather probing our central cultural conundrum — Lee Harvey Oswald: Patsy or Lone Assassin? Read full book review >

TRUE CRIME
Released: April 1, 1995

"Writing with Billy Joe Chambers's full cooperation, Adler has produced a remarkable record of the day-to-day operation of an enormously successful drug operation. (Author tour)"
An incisive rags-to-riches-to-prison tale of a dirt-poor family from the Arkansas Delta that capitalized on the booming Detroit crack market in the 1980s. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 28, 1995

"His amateur pop-psychological analyses of the killers' family lives aside, Smith, a solid writer and an excellent reporter (he writes for Esquire), makes this horrendous story almost readable. (Photos, not seen)"
This intricate re-creation of the February 1993 murder of three-year-old James Bulger by two 10-year-old boys in Bottle, England, is ugly, painful reading. Read full book review >
TRUE CRIME
Released: Feb. 1, 1995

"Less interesting than the headlines promised. (16 pages of photos, not seen)"
A pedestrian retelling of a true crime case involving mass murder at the University of Iowa. Read full book review >
SOCIAL SCIENCES
Released: Jan. 9, 1995

"38;w photos, not seen)."
A murdered Yale student and a 15-year-old New Haven gangbanger charged with the crime are the principals in this passionate, self- consciously empathetic account of the clash between poverty and privilege. Read full book review >
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Dec. 1, 1994

"Deeply disturbing and utterly convincing."
A shattering real-life Hand That Rocks the Cradle account, by veteran true-crime writer Egginton (Day of Fury, 1991, etc.). Read full book review >
CHARMER by Jack Olsen
TRUE CRIME
Released: Nov. 21, 1994

"Russell's compulsion to kill is less in evidence here than is Olsen's compulsion to churn out yet another murderous tale. (Author tour)"
Best-selling true-crime writer Olsen's latest account of psychopathic terror is little more than a chronological retelling of the basic facts. Read full book review >
THE COMPLETE HISTORY OF JACK THE RIPPER by Philip Sugden
TRUE CRIME
Released: Nov. 15, 1994

"Sugden's factual treatment of the murders provides a meticulous and reasoned profile for readers and future detectives. (Photos and maps, not seen)"
This exacting book adds a cogent historical investigation to the relatively few intelligent books about the father of all serial killers. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Nancy Isenberg
author of WHITE TRASH
July 19, 2016

Poor Americans have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over 400 years, in White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America, Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. “A riveting thesis supported by staggering research,” our reviewer writes in a starred review. View video >