True Crime Book Reviews (page 6)

GHETTOSIDE by Jill Leovy
Released: Jan. 27, 2015

"A sobering and informative look at the realities of criminality in the inner city."
Los Angeles Times reporter and editor Leovy looks at the thinly veiled racist origins of violence in South Central LA. Read full book review >
MURDER AT CAMP DELTA by Joseph Hickman
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"A plainly told, unsettling corrective to the many jingoistic accounts of post-9/11 military action."
Disturbing account of abuse and secrecy at the Guantánamo Bay military prison, tied to the deaths of three detainees. Read full book review >

Released: Jan. 13, 2015

"An eye-opening story of evil in a holy place."
The long-hidden story of the ultimate convent scandal, masterfully retold. Read full book review >
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"The fascinating story of a once-invincible man 'who has made the best of the cards that life has dealt him but…revealed himself to possess to an equally extreme degree the insecurities that all are prey to.'"
An engaging biography of the Olympic sprinter and convicted killer we thought we knew. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 28, 2014

"Weaving a tale that is simultaneously about race, failed systems, money, sex, family and simple rage, Safran truly did lose a year in Mississippi, and getting lost with him is a joy."
A murdered white supremacist sparks a remarkable investigation that is anything but straightforward. Read full book review >

Released: Nov. 18, 2014

"A clumsy account about a tragic collision in which justice seems already to have been served."
Memoir of time spent with a deeply unpleasant and, in the end, murderous mogul. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 15, 2014

"A thoroughgoing but occasionally plodding story that awaits a better writer. For now, though, this is the best available account of a crime that, though a cold case, still has people talking."
An examination of the spasm of violence popularly dubbed the "Texarkana moonlight murders." Read full book review >
HELL-BENT by Jason Ryan
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"Without well-known criminal names or impressive crimes to pull an audience in, this will likely appeal only to Mafia buffs."
Ryan (Jackpot: High Times, High Seas, and the Sting that Launched the War on Drugs, 2011) delivers his second true-crime tale, this time covering "Hawaii's underworld."Read full book review >
TOO BIG TO JAIL by Brandon L. Garrett
Released: Nov. 1, 2014

"Garrett combines groundbreaking research with clear writing and moral outrage."
Garrett (Law/Univ. of Virginia; Convicting the Innocent: Where Criminal Prosecutions Go Wrong, 2011, etc.) presents research on criminal behavior by corporations in the United States and overseas. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"A wild, well-told tale."
A colorful account of reform efforts to eradicate sin, corruption and violence in early-20th-century New Orleans. Read full book review >
JUST MERCY by Bryan Stevenson
Released: Oct. 21, 2014

"Emotionally profound, necessary reading."
A distinguished NYU law professor and MacArthur grant recipient offers the compelling story of the legal practice he founded to protect the rights of people on the margins of American society. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 16, 2014

"An intriguing story told in the style of Thomas Hardy or George Eliot, if they traded in true crime."
The mystery of what happened in the summer of 1889 "beneath the skin of propriety and manners" at a British mansion. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >