True Crime Book Reviews (page 7)

CHASE YOUR SHADOW by John Carlin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 9, 2014

"The fascinating story of a once-invincible man 'who has made the best of the cards that life has dealt him but…revealed himself to possess to an equally extreme degree the insecurities that all are prey to.'"
An engaging biography of the Olympic sprinter and convicted killer we thought we knew. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 28, 2014

"Weaving a tale that is simultaneously about race, failed systems, money, sex, family and simple rage, Safran truly did lose a year in Mississippi, and getting lost with him is a joy."
A murdered white supremacist sparks a remarkable investigation that is anything but straightforward. Read full book review >

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 18, 2014

"A clumsy account about a tragic collision in which justice seems already to have been served."
Memoir of time spent with a deeply unpleasant and, in the end, murderous mogul. Read full book review >
TRUE CRIME
Released: Nov. 15, 2014

"A thoroughgoing but occasionally plodding story that awaits a better writer. For now, though, this is the best available account of a crime that, though a cold case, still has people talking."
An examination of the spasm of violence popularly dubbed the "Texarkana moonlight murders." Read full book review >
HELL-BENT by Jason Ryan
NATURE & TRAVEL
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"Without well-known criminal names or impressive crimes to pull an audience in, this will likely appeal only to Mafia buffs."
Ryan (Jackpot: High Times, High Seas, and the Sting that Launched the War on Drugs, 2011) delivers his second true-crime tale, this time covering "Hawaii's underworld."Read full book review >

TOO BIG TO JAIL by Brandon L. Garrett
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Nov. 1, 2014

"Garrett combines groundbreaking research with clear writing and moral outrage."
Garrett (Law/Univ. of Virginia; Convicting the Innocent: Where Criminal Prosecutions Go Wrong, 2011, etc.) presents research on criminal behavior by corporations in the United States and overseas. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"A wild, well-told tale."
A colorful account of reform efforts to eradicate sin, corruption and violence in early-20th-century New Orleans. Read full book review >
JUST MERCY by Bryan Stevenson
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 21, 2014

"Emotionally profound, necessary reading."
A distinguished NYU law professor and MacArthur grant recipient offers the compelling story of the legal practice he founded to protect the rights of people on the margins of American society. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 16, 2014

"An intriguing story told in the style of Thomas Hardy or George Eliot, if they traded in true crime."
The mystery of what happened in the summer of 1889 "beneath the skin of propriety and manners" at a British mansion. Read full book review >
HISTORY
Released: Oct. 15, 2014

"Worsley ably shows how audiences drove writers, actors and purveyors of news to satisfy their morbid curiosities."
Worsley (If Walls Could Talk: An Intimate History of the Home, 2012, etc.) explains England's love affair with scandals, lurid murders and executions. Read full book review >
BAD PAPER by Jake Halpern
BUSINESS & ECONOMICS
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"Halpern brings unexpected literary heft to the world of debt collection."
An investigation of the bottom-feeding underworld of debt collecting and its disreputable cast of rip-off artists. Read full book review >
DRUGS UNLIMITED by Mike Power
CURRENT AFFAIRS
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A compelling, accessible perspective on the global e-tail drug market."
A comprehensive report on how the Internet has revolutionized illicit narcotic sales. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Michael Eric Dyson
February 2, 2016

In Michael Eric Dyson’s rich and nuanced book new book, The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America, Dyson writes with passion and understanding about Barack Obama’s “sad and disappointing” performance regarding race and black concerns in his two terms in office. While race has defined his tenure, Obama has been “reluctant to take charge” and speak out candidly about the nation’s racial woes, determined to remain “not a black leader but a leader who is black.” Dyson cogently examines Obama’s speeches and statements on race, from his first presidential campaign through recent events—e.g., the Ferguson riots and the eulogy for the Rev. Clementa Pinckney in Charleston—noting that the president is careful not to raise the ire of whites and often chastises blacks for their moral failings. At his best, he spoke with “special urgency for black Americans” during the Ferguson crisis and was “at his blackest,” breaking free of constraints, in his “Amazing Grace” Charleston eulogy. Dyson writes here as a realistic, sometimes-angry supporter of the president. View video >