True Crime Book Reviews (page 7)

Released: Oct. 15, 2014

"Worsley ably shows how audiences drove writers, actors and purveyors of news to satisfy their morbid curiosities."
Worsley (If Walls Could Talk: An Intimate History of the Home, 2012, etc.) explains England's love affair with scandals, lurid murders and executions. Read full book review >
BAD PAPER by Jake Halpern
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"Halpern brings unexpected literary heft to the world of debt collection."
An investigation of the bottom-feeding underworld of debt collecting and its disreputable cast of rip-off artists. Read full book review >

Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"A compelling, accessible perspective on the global e-tail drug market."
A comprehensive report on how the Internet has revolutionized illicit narcotic sales. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 14, 2014

"Informative but often unwieldy history of a pivotal period for race relations in the American South."
A Reconstruction-era kidnapping incident in the Deep South gets put under the historical microscope. Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 7, 2014

"A historically resonant reminder of how far societal tolerance has come and that it still remains a work in progress."
The story of a Gilded Age-era homicide that stunned a nation with its sheer violence and tabooed origins. Read full book review >

Released: Sept. 23, 2014

"Comprehensive research underlies this compelling, highly emotional and profoundly important story."
A novelist and Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter explores with nearly Javert-ian persistence one of the early cases of traffic fatalities caused by texting while driving.
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Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"The daring cleverness of both Wild and Sheppard makes for fun historical reading."
How the beginnings of true crime reporting and the birth of tabloid journalism can be tagged to Daniel Defoe's years in prison for libelous sedition. Read full book review >
BLOOD IN THE FIELDS by Julia Reynolds
Released: Sept. 1, 2014

"A sprawling, literary true-crime effort that will reward patient readers with its gloomy account of an unstoppable, violent subculture."
Brisk, detailed exposé of the little-understood gang Nuestra Familia.
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Released: Sept. 1, 2014

"While certain technical portions may be difficult for some readers, true-crime enthusiasts will find the payoff worth the effort."
The history of one of the foundational elements of entertainment media today—forensic evidence—and how it is that we make sense of it. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 18, 2014

"An entertaining and provocative portrait of a man whose dichotomies were largely a product of the violent times in which he thrived."
The big life and fast times of one of the most charismatic and dangerous good ol' boys in America's criminal history. Read full book review >
WORKING STIFF by Judy Melinek
Released: Aug. 12, 2014

"A transfixing account of death, from the mundane to the oddly hair-raising."
A lively chronicle of a death investigator's days, from forensic pathologist Melinek and her husband, Mitchell. Read full book review >
Released: Aug. 5, 2014

"A sound, sobering report that's more educative than eye-opening."
A scholarly treatise on the case for American penal reform. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >