True Crime Book Reviews (page 9)

THE POISONER by Stephen Bates
Released: May 15, 2014

"A pleasantly instructive social history."
Sprightly look at the parochial mid-19th-century England that produced an infamous serial poisoner. Read full book review >
SLAVERY INC. by Lydia Cacho
Released: May 13, 2014

"It's clear that Cacho, with such passion for her subject, understands far more than her audience will. Unfortunately, she fails to make the connections for those who don't have her background knowledge."
Award-winning El Universal journalist Cacho has a history of crusading for human rights through her work. Here, she chronicles her global travels to document the world of human trafficking. Read full book review >

Released: May 13, 2014

"A swift-moving history of and tribute to officers who are 'out there at all hours of the day and night, kicking down doors, stopping vehicles, and arresting heinous fugitives.'"
The story behind the country's oldest law enforcement agency, the U.S. Marshals service, as told by its former associate director for operations Earp, with veteran co-author Fisher (co-author, with Tom Coughlin: Earn the Right to Win, 2013, etc.). Read full book review >
Released: May 5, 2014

"A compelling, nuanced look at the shifting, volatile meaning of American identity in the post-9/11 era."
Well-crafted account of an act of post-9/11 vigilante violence and its long reverberations for its survivors. Read full book review >
LICENSED TO LIE by Sidney Powell
Released: May 1, 2014

"The author brings the case for judicial redress before the court of public opinion."
A former Justice Department lawyer, who now devotes her private practice to federal appeals, dissects some of the most politically contentious prosecutions of the last 15 years. Read full book review >

SHARDS by Allison Moore
Released: April 22, 2014

"An addition to the world of addiction literature worth reading, full of grim reality that thankfully never crosses the line into gratuitous territory."
An honest, introspective account of a vice cop's methamphetamine addiction. Read full book review >
Released: April 22, 2014

"A fascinating history that, while particularly appealing to those interested in religion, is sure to inform a far wider audience."
An account of the Illinois Mormon settlement Nauvoo and the events that precipitated the church's flight to Utah. Read full book review >
Released: April 15, 2014

"A sad reality graced with hope, humanity and compassion."
The atrocity of sexual abuse as told by a captivating, diverse collective of survivors. Read full book review >
Released: April 8, 2014

"These 'men of honor' and 'lads with attitude' created their own myths. Until Dickie's revelatory book, most believed them."
Call them Camorra, 'Ndrangheta or Mafia: All of these "honored societies" emerged from the dirty politics of Italian unification. Dickie's (Italian Studies/Univ. College, London; Delizia! The Epic History of Italians and Their Food, 2007, etc.) absorbing history of the Italian mob makes The Godfather look like a fairy tale. Read full book review >
Released: April 8, 2014

"A comprehensive, illuminating and highly readable study of a notorious episode in the annals of the American justice system."
Vanity Fair contributing editor and Duke University alumnus Cohan (Money and Power: How Goldman Sachs Came to Rule the World, 2011) turns a microscopic lens on the 2006 scandal involving an alleged rape by members of the school's lacrosse team. Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 2014

"Preserves like a frozen capsule the British grin-and-bear-it spirit and vocabulary of the WWII years."
A secretary to a formidable London pathologist during World War II reissues her wry, grisly account of murder and corpses, first published in 1955. Read full book review >
Released: April 1, 2014

"Journalism that demonstrates all the arguments why we need professionals to tell the stories that mark our generations and a valentine to the people that proved Boston Strong."
In a remarkable work of narrative journalism, Boston Globe journalists Helman (co-author: The Real Romney, 2012) and Russell (co-author: Last Lion: The Fall and Rise of Ted Kennedy, 2009), with support from their comrades at the Globe's news department, map out the heartbreaks, dogged pursuits and courageous acts of defiance that resulted from one of America's most foolhardy and cowardly acts of terrorism. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >