True Crime Book Reviews

Released: Nov. 15, 2015

"An urgent but evenhanded treatise that deserves a wide readership."
In Norwegian-born attorney Turrettini's dispiriting estimation, there are plenty of lone wolves out there, young men—almost always young men—so disconnected from the world that killing is the only form of self-expression they think is left to them. Read full book review >
THE CON MEN by Terry Williams
Released: Nov. 10, 2015

"A thoroughly researched academic study accessible to general readers."
Two sociology professors' survey of New York con artists and how these reviled but crafty opportunists manage to make a living in the city's informal economy. Read full book review >

THEY ALL LOVE JACK by Bruce Robinson
Released: Oct. 13, 2015

"A ripping good read, strange, suggestive, and memorable."
A wild ride down the back alleys of London in the service of "Ripperology." Read full book review >
Released: Oct. 5, 2015

"Besides recounting years of subterfuge, media hype, greed, and fraud, Eatwell throws light on Victorian and Edwardian society: aristocratic entitlement and power, numbing poverty, political corruption, and many secret lives."
The tale of a sensational trial that riveted Edwardian England for more than a decade. Read full book review >
BLACK FLAGS by Joby Warrick
Released: Sept. 29, 2015

"Warrick stops short of offering policy solutions, but he provides a valuable, readable introduction to a pressing international security threat."
Crisply written, chilling account of the personalities behind the emergence of the Islamic State, or ISIS. Read full book review >

Released: Sept. 22, 2015

"A bleak but thoughtful look at the curse of urban violence, both its causalities and its long-term effects."
A shocking tale of a mistaken-identity multiple murder and its aftermath. Read full book review >
THE RISING by Ryan D'Agostino
Released: Sept. 15, 2015

"True crime and human perseverance merge in this engrossing chronicle of a small-town atrocity."
A chilling examination of the 2007 slaughter of a Connecticut family and how the sole survivor carried on. Read full book review >
A IS FOR ARSENIC by Kathryn Harkup
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"The addition of real-life cases and comparisons to Christie's works make this a nice little murder mystery of its own. Fear not, she's careful not to spoil the endings of the classic novels."
Chemist Harkup's first book is the product of her passion for the work of Agatha Christie and her broad knowledge and research in the matter of poisons. Read full book review >
Idolatry, Leadership, and Terrorism by Phillip Williams
Released: Sept. 7, 2015

"A thoughtful if unfortunately truncated analysis of modern terrorism."
Debut author Williams confronts the violent emergence of terrorism by appraising its root causes in modernity itself. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 1, 2015

"Useful for anyone with a horse in the race regarding law enforcement—in other words, most American citizens."
A handbook for making sense of America's approach to crime and incarceration and its effect on communities across the country. Read full book review >
SHOTS ON THE BRIDGE by Ronnie Greene
Released: Aug. 18, 2015

"A poignant and skillful examination of a case that adds to the ongoing public debate about corrupt police practices, the militarization of local law enforcement, and convoluted legal decisions."
Associated Press investigative journalist Greene (Night Fire: Big Oil, Poison Air, and Margie Richard's Fight to Save Her Town, 2009) examines the shockingly overlooked case of police brutality that left six unarmed citizens shot during the chaotic aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.Read full book review >
BLUE by Joe Domanick
Released: Aug. 11, 2015

"Sprawling, engrossing, and highly relevant to the ongoing controversies about policing post-Ferguson, which Domanick addresses in an epilogue."
An incisive examination of American policing, using a tumultuous two decades in Los Angeles as a lens. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
Jason Gay
November 17, 2015

In the 1990s, copies of Richard Carlson’s Don't Sweat the Small Stuff (and its many sequels) were seemingly everywhere, giving readers either the confidence to prioritize their stresses or despondence over the slender volume’s not addressing their particular set of problems. While not the first book of its kind, it kicked open the door for an industry of self-help, worry-reduction advice guides. In his first book, Little Victories, Wall Street Journal sports columnist Gay takes less of a guru approach, though he has drawn an audience of readers appreciative of reportage that balances insights with a droll, self-deprecating outlook. He occasionally focuses his columns on “the Rules” (of Thanksgiving family touch football, the gym, the office holiday party, etc.), which started as a genial poke in the eye at the proliferation of self-help books and, over time, came to explore actual advice “both practical and ridiculous” and “neither perfect nor universal.” The author admirably combines those elements in every piece in the book. View video >