THE PEOPLE AND THE PROMISE by Ursula Synge

THE PEOPLE AND THE PROMISE

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

And Ra-Mose continued to frequent the by-ways of Goshen"" -- thus transforming himself, with the help of Yahweh, from an Egyptian Prince into a visionary patriarch capable of imposing monotheism on the Hebrew people. Interwoven with his mission, for purposes of exposition, is the tale of Leah, a simple wife who like so many of the women clings to the old gods of the hearth. One can't help admiring Synge's ambition -- which encompasses the whole book of Exodus in the experiences of these two marginally related participants and scrupulously dramatizes the triumph of the male Deity over his female competitors. But the big scenes -- the burning bush, the parting of the Red Sea. .you name them -- don't match the Biblical originals and RaMose (whose bull-rush origins are intuited later on) seems insufferably arrogant compared to the humble Leah. In fact, those readers who can understand what's going on may well find themselves in sympathy with the losing side. As a novel this tries mightily and succeeds here and there -- but will he most sympathetically received as a footnote to religious education studies.

Pub Date: Dec. 15th, 1975
Page count: 192pp
Publisher: S.G. Phillips