A KID’S GUIDE TO LATINO HISTORY

MORE THAN 50 ACTIVITIES

This well-documented resource, designed to support the social-science curricula in elementary- and middle-school classrooms, offers clear instructions on how to make 54 hands-on activities that celebrate the beauty and diversity of the Latino culture in the United States. Each chapter includes historical background, illustrations, maps and critical-thinking questions. Information is presented in chronological order, beginning with the Pre-Columbian civilizations and the Spanish conquest followed by the Spanish colonies in North America, Mexican independence and life in the Mexican Southwest. Individual chapters highlight the major Latino immigrant waves: Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, Central Americans, Dominican Americans and South Americans. The last chapter, “Latinos: Past, Present and Future,” discusses immigration issues. This guide will not only assist teachers and students but youth services librarians committed to presenting programs that reflect the history and achievements of the ethnic groups that make up the 15 percent of the U.S. population. (timeline, introduction, bibliographies, Latino museums, suggested reading list for kids, Latino movies and videos, websites, teacher’s guide, history standards and learning objectives) (Nonfiction. 7 & up)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 2009

ISBN: 978-1-55652-771-5

Page Count: 208

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2009

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An empowering choice.

WHAT'S THE BIG DEAL ABOUT ELECTIONS

Shamir and Faulkner take readers on a trip through various moments in U.S. history as they explore the democratic process.

The text begins in 1884, when a young man rides for hours to deliver his local ballot box in the state of Nebraska. The book then jumps in nonlinear fashion from key moment to key moment, explaining its importance: Native Americans were granted citizenship in 1924 (their status as members of sovereign nations goes unmentioned); the emergency number 911 was created in 1968; George Washington was the only presidential candidate ever to run unopposed. The information is divided into general paragraphs that begin with a question and text boxes that supply trivia and provide additional context to the paragraphs. Children’s and teens’ roles are often cited, such as their participation in the civil rights movement and the lowering of the voting age from 21 to 18. The information ranges from national elections to local, expanding on what can be done on a national level and what can occur locally. Along the way, Faulkner includes a diverse mixture of citizens. A range of ethnic groups, minorities, and people of various body sizes and abilities are included, making the book visually welcoming to all readers. An early image depicting a blind woman with both guide dog and cane appears to be the only visual misstep. The backmatter includes a timeline and sources for additional reading.

An empowering choice. (Informational picture book. 7-12)

Pub Date: Aug. 28, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-5247-3807-5

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Philomel

Review Posted Online: June 25, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2018

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A beautiful, powerful reflection on a tragic history.

ON THE HORIZON

In spare verse, Lowry reflects on moments in her childhood, including the bombings of Pearl Harbor and Hiroshima. 

When she was a child, Lowry played at Waikiki Beach with her grandmother while her father filmed. In the old home movie, the USS Arizona appears through the mist on the horizon. Looking back at her childhood in Hawaii and then Japan, Lowry reflects on the bombings that began and ended a war and how they affected and connected everyone involved. In Part 1, she shares the lives and actions of sailors at Pearl Harbor. Part 2 is stories of civilians in Hiroshima affected by the bombing. Part 3 presents her own experience as an American in Japan shortly after the war ended. The poems bring the haunting human scale of war to the forefront, like the Christmas cards a sailor sent days before he died or the 4-year-old who was buried with his red tricycle after Hiroshima. All the personal stories—of sailors, civilians, and Lowry herself—are grounding. There is heartbreak and hope, reminding readers to reflect on the past to create a more peaceful future. Lowry uses a variety of poetry styles, identifying some, such as triolet and haiku. Pak’s graphite illustrations are like still shots of history, adding to the emotion and somber feeling. He includes some sailors of color among the mostly white U.S. forces; Lowry is white.

A beautiful, powerful reflection on a tragic history. (author’s note, bibliography) (Memoir/poetry. 10-14)

Pub Date: April 7, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-358-12940-0

Page Count: 80

Publisher: HMH Books

Review Posted Online: Jan. 12, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2020

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