FROM THE SHADOW OF THE MOUNTAIN by Van Wyck Brooks

FROM THE SHADOW OF THE MOUNTAIN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Sub-titled My Post Meridian Years, this is a potpourri of memories, opinions, conclusions, a very rich pudding of a book for those of us whose years have roughly paral- his own and whose paths have been on the periphery of his. There is, perhaps, less than in the earlier volumes of autobiography- Scenes and Portraits and Days of the , but it rounds out one's knowledge of the man in his time. His lifelong dedication of American writing, his hope that in his Makers and Finders series he would writers a sense of roots, of traditions, of pride in what America has contributed to the literary scene, and largely his interest in writers and artists as people he known, all this adds up to an impressive panel. Connecticut, New York, briefly Cam travels north and south and west, England, Ireland, France and Italy -- and always of people he met whose names star-stud the literary scene -- such was the pattern those years when he realized only too fully the changing climate of opinion. He began to into focus the modern writers, many of whom he feels have rejected human decency and to reflect the tempo of the country; he took in his stride the charge that he had behind his age, was out of fashion, but he rarely flagged in his conviction that what written will continue to give background to new writers.

Publisher: Dutton