PASTEUR AND THE INVISIBLE GIANTS by

PASTEUR AND THE INVISIBLE GIANTS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The familiar story of the tanner's son who became the ""miracle worker"" of France is here retold on a simpler level than in Vallery-Radot's Great Life in Brief. This is a first book for Mr. Dolan, and one can sense from his approach that he is a teacher by profession. The facts are injected into the narrative with careful clarity: Pasteur's schooldays; his work as laboratory assistant; his early aptitude for original scientific thinking that led him step by step to discoveries in crystalline structures, fermentation, and then to the solution of the mystery of contagious disease- first in silkworms, sheep and cattle, and then in human beings. His personal life is paralleled with his professional accomplishments- marriage, children, and finally the peaceful death. This is the kind of book one would give a student who wishes or needs to know enough about Pasteur to recognize his place in the world of science and men. Its style may prohibit a more general audience.

Pub Date: Sept. 22nd, 1958
Publisher: Dodd, Mead