PASSPORT TO PARIS by Vernon Duke

PASSPORT TO PARIS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Glistening with famous personalities, shifting from the Continent to America, the autobiography of a composer with a schizophrenic output is rich with the lore of recent worlds of theatre and music. Vladimir Dukelsky's boyhood was spent in Russia, but his training at Kiev was curtailed by the necessity for escape after the October Revolution. Out of Odessa on the last ship, he arrived at Constantinople, and his path led on to youthful years in Paris, where he worked for Diaghilev. As Vladimir Dukelsky he created music of the serious but unrewarding kind- encouraged by Prokofiev and played by Koussevitsky; as Vernon Duke, a creation of his beloved friend George Gershwin, he produced unserious music that kept him eating. Broadway and Hollywood claimed his attention. Overlong, a little sad as the author takes increasingly the role of spectator, this still has the elements of an unusual personal story and famous names to carry readers through it.

Publisher: Little, Brown