THE LONGEST AUTO RACE by

THE LONGEST AUTO RACE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

PARIS, France, July 30, 1908 (Kirkus News Service)--The longest automobile race in history, from New York to Paris, was won at 6 P.M. today when a Thomas Flyer arrived at the offices of Le Matin on Boulevard Poissonniere, climaxing a 13,341 mile journey spaced over 169 days. Winning driver is George Schuster, 35, an American from Buffalo, N.Y. Mr. Schuster was accompanied by three companions who assisted him in mechanical repairs en route, hauling, changing tires, etc. The topless, windshieldless self-moving car and its passengers endured blizzards, the American desert, the rigors of Alaska, and crossed Japan, Siberia, Russia, Germany and France to win the $1,000 prize. Six cars competed in the race, which began on Lincoln's Birthday, Feb. 12, in Times Square with a crowd of 250,000 well-wishers. Several cars broke down, came to grief or were disqualified. Schuster's team has also gone the farthest distance, adding an extra 3,000 miles when attempting an impassable route through Alaska. The car was shipped from Seattle to Japan and from Japan to Russia. It occasionally maintained a phenomenal speed of 60 mph. Meanwhile, at his home in Yasnaya Polyana, famed Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy is reported to have commented, ""This beats the movies all hollow! I'm getting a Thomas Flyer, if my wife will let me.

Pub Date: Feb. 8th, 1965
Publisher: John Day