THE FIFTH WORLD OF ENOCH MALONEY by Vincent Crapanzano

THE FIFTH WORLD OF ENOCH MALONEY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

According to legend the Navahos have passed through four worlds driven by sorcery and witchcraft to reach the fifth world of sun, moon and light. This is a disturbing, both personal and anthropological, look at this contemporary world, through the journal of Mr. Crapanzano who spent one summer observing Enoch Maloney, a fifty-year-old Navaho. Enoch was chosen because he is fairly representative of the middle-class Indian, mod acculturated yet subscribing to parts of the traditional if moribund Navaho society. The book is almost surreal in effect--there is such an immense dichotomy between American and Navaho tradition and standards. The author makes acute observations as he listens to Enoch's fantasies. . . about Sally, a possible fourth wife. . . about his experiences in the military (which seem to have had the most profound effect), his family and children (extremely complicated relationships), etc. Together they attend ceremonies and pow-wows and even court proceedings as the author manages to penetrate each aspect in what he calls the ""theatre of social change."" The book gives necessary insight into a problem that is expanding with each generation (the Navahos are one of the fastest growing populations in the world). It should be studied to help them from a fifth world of apathy and poverty into a sixth world of hope.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 1969
Publisher: Random House