VINTAGE REVIEWS

THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD by Zora Neale Hurston
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 16, 1937

"A poignant story, told with almost rhythmic beauty."
I loved Jonah's Gourd Vine — thought some of her short stories very fine — and feel that this measures up to the promise of the early books. Read full book review >
NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR by George Orwell
Released: June 13, 1949

"Certain to create interest, comment, and consideration."
The Book-of-the-Month Club dual selection, with John Gunther's Behind the Curtain (1949), for July, this projects life under perfected state controls. Read full book review >

A PERFECT SPY by John le Carré
Released: May 1, 1986

"Dickensian prose yet: occasionally self-conscious or precious, often stirring, magical, gravely joyous."
The "perfect spy" in this bitter, stately le Carré novel—more character-study than thriller—is Magnus Pym, 50-ish, a senior spymaster for Britain, based in Vienna. . .but now, suddenly, disappeared, after returning to England for the funeral of his old father, Rick. Read full book review >
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 1999

General William Tecumseh Sherman, perhaps the Union Army's fiercest and most complicated soldier, wages war in these letters against the Confederacy, the press—and himself. Read full book review >

BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S by Truman Capote
Released: Oct. 28, 1959

Excursions into other worlds of other depths have been the source material and trademark of Capote's literary career. Read full book review >


Released: April 1, 1934

"Headlined as the leading book on the publisher's list and sure of a good send-off."
Again an author who has built up a more or less established market, and his non appearance (in book form) over a period of several years, has stimulated interest in this first full length work since the publication of The Great Gatsby. Read full book review >
THINGS FALL APART by Chinua Achebe
Released: Jan. 23, 1958

Written with quiet dignity that builds to a climax of tragic force, this book about the dissolution of an African tribe, its traditions, and values, represents a welcome departure from the familiar "Me, white brother" genre. Read full book review >

Released: Sept. 21, 1983

"The least lazy of our critics, he may now be our best."
It's entirely possible that history's choice for the finest literary critic to find steady exposure in the pages of the New Yorker will not be Edmund Wilson—but rather John Updike, who here gathers over 100 reviews and essays from recent years. Read full book review >
A SENSE OF WHERE YOU ARE by John McPhee
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 27, 1965

"Twenty-one, and an Olympic champion, he has retired to the cloisters!"
What a rare sports book! Read full book review >
A DRINK BEFORE THE WAR by Dennis Lehane
MYSTERY & CRIME
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"A lively debut about residents of the Boston metropolitan area who don't summer in Hyannisport."
Patrick Kenzie is a Dorchester, Mass., boy born and bred. Read full book review >
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 3, 1976

When first seen at his second death, the solitary despot who has lived for a conjectural 107 to 232 years, lies in his dungheap "house of castaways," vultures pecking at his body while a cow appears on the balcony where he delivered his pronunciamentos. Read full book review >
HELLO, HE LIED by Lynda Obst
ENTERTAINMENT & SPORTS
Released: Sept. 4, 1996

If the Girl Scout troops of Beverly Hills need an illuminating manual for their Fundamentals of Successful Producing merit badge, this is it. Read full book review >