THE BAD BEGINNING by Lemony Snicket
Released: Sept. 30, 1999

"Those who enjoy a little poison in their porridge will find it wicked good fun. (b&w illustrations, not seen) (Fiction. 10-12)"
The Baudelaire children—Violet, 14, Klaus, 12, and baby Sunny—are exceedingly ill-fated; Snicket extracts both humor and horror from their situation, as he gleefully puts them through one terrible ordeal after another. Read full book review >
Released: Jan. 10, 1963

"It is all expertly chilling and exciting."
A modern variant of The Third Man is sponsored by that book's author (Graham Greene says, "The best spy story I have ever read") and it introduces on this side of the water pseudonymous Mr. Le Carré, who is a fine contrast to flamboyant Mr. Fleming and who proves here that one can be just as unnerving by being thoroughly undemonstrative. Read full book review >

FORCE MAJEURE by Bruce Wagner
Released: Aug. 1, 1991

"Richly done boffo winner."
Smashing debut novel in which screenwriter Bud Wiggin, a Thomas Wolfe for failed screenwriters, seems to be a stand-in for author Wagner—screenwriter of the stupid but successful Scenes from the Class Struggle in Beverly Hills and Nightmare on Elm Street 3. Read full book review >
PAPAL SIN by Garry Wills
Released: June 6, 2000

"An invigorating read that is sure to spark controversy."
Popes used to sin openly, and Catholics knew it, writes Pulitzer Prize-winner Wills (John Wayne's America, 1997, etc.) in his new study of contemporary Catholicism. Read full book review >
LINCOLN by David Herbert Donald
Released: Oct. 1, 1995

"A magisterial work, destined to assume its place with those of Beveridge, Sandburg, Thomas, and Oates as a standard life of Lincoln. (Book-of-the-Month Club split main selection; History Book Club main selection)"
In a significant contribution to Lincoln scholarship, distinguished historian and Pulitzer Prizewinning biographer Donald (Harvard; Look Homeward: A Life of Thomas Wolfe, 1987, etc.) draws a richly detailed, absorbing portrait of our 16th president. Read full book review >

SKIN TIGHT by Carl Hiaasen
Released: Sept. 11, 1989

"Great entertainment, Hiaasen's best."
Black-humored crime-novelist Hiaasen (Tourist Season, 1986; Double Whammy, 1987) tops himself here, exploding sardonic marvels on nearly every page—in an exceptionally inventive tale of a retired Florida cop and his run-ins with the weirdest villains this side of Batman. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 22, 1941

"Sure sales and rentals."
The author of The Postman Always Rings Twice and Serenade turns from the shock technique of both of these to present an incisive, full length portrait of a woman in business, and her emotional dependency on her coldblooded, greedy, captious daughter — Veda. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 21, 1979

"A bountifully compassionate and moving book, some portions of which have appeared in The New Yorker."
In these ten interlinked, chronological stories about Ontario girl Rose, Munro—like Joyce Carol Oates in her early novels—penetrates, with bowsprit knowledge and (unlike Oates) irrepressible tenderness, the iced-in continent of the working-class poor and the erratic course of those who get away. Read full book review >
WOODSONG by Gary Paulsen
Released: Aug. 1, 1990

"This may be Paulsen's best book yet: it should delight and enthrall almost any reader."
A three-time Newbery Honor winner tells—in a memoir that is even more immediate and compelling than his novels—about his intimate relationship with Minnesota's north woods and the dog team he trained for Alaska's Iditarod. Read full book review >
Released: Nov. 29, 1982

"One is appalled by Johnson—and awed."
Depth of research and depth of feeling make the difference. Read full book review >
Released: Sept. 1, 1987

"Solidly drawn characters, keen psychological insights and an intriguing, well-knit plot—along with a rather florid but individual writing style—make Rankin a newcomer to watch."
A compelling first novel sent in Edinburgh, where a series of killings of young girls has the city in a panic. Read full book review >
EAST OF EDEN by John Steinbeck
Released: Sept. 19, 1952

"But John Steinbeck, the philosopher, dominates his material and brings it into sharply moral focus."
Tremendous in scope- tremendous in depth of penetration- and as different a Steinbeck as the Steinbeck of Burning Bright was from the Steinbeck of Grates of th. Read full book review >
Kirkus Interview
John Sandford
author of SATURN RUN
October 6, 2015

Saturn Run, John Sandford’s new novel, is quite a departure for the bestselling thriller writer, who sets aside his Lucas Davenport crime franchise (Gathering Prey, 2015, etc.) and partners with photographer and sci-fi buff Ctein to leave Earth’s gravitational field for the rings of Saturn. The year is 2066. A Caltech intern inadvertently notices an anomaly from a space telescope—something is approaching Saturn, and decelerating. Space objects don’t decelerate; spaceships do. A flurry of top-level government meetings produces the inescapable conclusion: whatever built that ship is at least 100 years ahead in hard and soft technology, and whoever can get their hands on it exclusively and bring it back will have an advantage so large, no other nation can compete. A conclusion the Chinese definitely agree with when they find out. The race is on. “James Bond meets Tom Swift, with the last word reserved not for extraterrestrial encounters but for international piracy, state secrets, and a spot of satisfyingly underhanded political pressure,” our reviewer writes. View video >