THE EVENING AND THE MORNING by Virginia Sorenson

THE EVENING AND THE MORNING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A telescoping of time in a woman's novel told on two levels,- a story of how Kate's rebellion, which held in it the seeds of her wholeness as a woman, and of her daughter Dessie's painful emergence from the strictures of her rigid Mormon upbringing. Through the paralleling of their stories, synchronized as Kate returns to visit the daughter she had left long years before, one gets a sensitive picture of life in a small Utah town today, a community in which fear of what others think of deviations from the established pattern can wreck human relations. The story is valuable perhaps primarily as a study of a way of life, written by someone who has been on the inside, and specifically of what that inheritance of traditional mores can mean to a woman's growth. The relationship of mother to daughter and to granddaughter is interestingly handled, though Kate's long periods of introspection slow the pace of the story. Virginia Sorenson has written two significant Mormon novels, and one much less good novel in which Mormonism is incidental to the story. This new book will appeal to those who liked the earlier books, A Little Lower than the Angels and On This Star.

Pub Date: April 22nd, 1949
Publisher: Harcourt, Brace