THE TWO WORLDS OF NORIKO by Vivian Breck

THE TWO WORLDS OF NORIKO

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Noriko was an attractive, popular Californian studying at Berkeley. She was also the daughter of the Yamatas, who still spoke Japanese and whose traditions and attitudes were those of the small Japanese village from which they came. For a graduation gift Noriko's parents gave her a three month trip to Japan, most of the time to be spent with their family in the country town of Miomura. Norido wanted to stay in Berkeley, find a job, and be near to Ken Mogi (""Ken is it for me""), but her Japanese training made it impossible for her to disobey her father. Miomura, Japan at its most provincial, was limbo for Noriko, who didn't seem to belong to either of her ""two worlds."" Mr. and Mrs. Yamata liked it there though, and decided to arrange a marriage between Noriko and one of the local farm boys. Noriko's realization that she must either act contrary to her own moral code and oppose her family or else accept a completely alien, unreasonable way of life is described with some sensitivity. However her decision to return to America and Ken, and the final details of their romance, flakes off into 99 44/100ths pure soap. Ken's attributes never seem very believable, and Noriko has the bad habit of gushing off into long explanations of her philosophy of love. The story is further bloated by the many unnecessary and uninteresting descriptions of the middle-aged American couple Noriko lived with in Berkeley. Cherry blossom sweet and just as short-lived.

Pub Date: Aug. 19th, 1966
Publisher: Doubleday