GIVE THE LADY WHAT SHE WANTS! by

GIVE THE LADY WHAT SHE WANTS!

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Not as personalized nor as bouncy an Emily Kimbrough's Through Charley's Door (Harper, P. 697, 1951), this is still a friendly chronicle, in honor of the centenary of Marshall Field and constitutes a sometimes fascinating store biography. Backgrounded by the changes as they occurred, by the growth of the city, by the emergence of women as a buying power, by society, fashion, taste and the creation of public demand, this reviews the early days of P. Palmer and his emporium, of Marshall Field and his first partner, L. Leiter, their start in business, their acquiring P. Palmer's store and their rocky first years. But even fires and again panics could not stop Field and Leiter and their group of bright young men, with their new ideas, their insistence on following Palmer's belief that the customer was always right and that service was the basis of their wholesale and retail trade. Their constantly improving their business led to the greatness of their merchandising. It makes a colorful story, mirroring Chicago through the century, and with the many pages of illustrations offers a panorama of the passing years. A local natural but not without national business interest and of definite feminine appeal.

Pub Date: May 5th, 1952
Publisher: Rand McNally