IN STALIN'S SECRET SERVICE by W. G. Krivitsky

IN STALIN'S SECRET SERVICE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This sensational expose has appeared in part in the S.E.P. and was off to a good start because of the break of his prediction of the union between Stalin and Hitler, which seemed to give credence to his word on other matters. He tells of how Stalin played Hitler over a period of years, in spite of the surface friction in verbal attacks and diplomatic snubs. He gives the inside story of many of the Russian purges and Stalin's fear of the power of the military groups of generals whom he finally liquidated. He shows how the Russian Secret Service operates in foreign countries. The author was for many years chief of the Military Intelligence in Western Europe and after seeing the fellow leaders eliminated he discovered his own name on a list, and escaped. There have been a number of articles taking exception to the author's veracity, particularly in his account of the part played by Russia in fomenting the Spanish Revolution. The complications of internal Soviet politics make the text at times confusing, but there is enough exciting adventure and personal record to carry over a sense of pace.

Pub Date: Nov. 17th, 1939
Publisher: Harper