THE LONELY SPRINTER by W. R. Loader

THE LONELY SPRINTER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Published in England under the title Testament of a Runner, this is an unusually articulate story of the author's experiences with the foot racing sport. He was one of those youngsters who ran the races in the schoolyard or in the orchard lane as if ""a hot iron were touching his backside"". He records his bitter defeats and hard-won victories through the first schoolboy stumbles and the tense Cambridge-Oxford meets with astute comments on the emotional and physical hazards of sprinting. Through it all the fierce joy of competition never abandoned him. What lifts this little book above the average sport dissertation is that the author feels that a good runner has a large dose of man's finest virtues: courage, strength, endurance and purpose. His descriptions of his sport, sketches of the great sprinters and distance runners and his analysis of the techniques and training are intelligent and seem to prove his point. It is a personal and civilized English approach to one of Britain's most revered sports.

Publisher: Macmillan