POTIONS, REMEDIES AND OLD WIVES' TALES by W. W. Bauer

POTIONS, REMEDIES AND OLD WIVES' TALES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The most that can be said for this is that it's non-injurious--clumps of disordered information relating to old folklore with what can be scientifically validated although how can one relate the material in the first chapter which deals with anything from wheels to listings of gods and goddesses, colors and numbers, and who did what when. Sometimes, Dr. Bauer's memory seems costive--thus three lists of presumptive cathartics and laxatives in chapters 5, 9 and 13, all approximately the same. And then there's his point of view (evidenced in earlier manuals on child-rearing and marriage): is washing out a child's mouth with soap a ""wholesome"" practice? Obviously in this catchall of salubrious and worthless ritual (the medicinal properties of certain herbs and foods; practices re hygiene and beauty; ""grannie's"" medicines; poisons; etc.) there's some information although it's hard to distinguish between the anesthetic properties of lettuce and Dr. Bauer.

Pub Date: June 27th, 1969
Publisher: Doubleday