SUMMER NEVER ENDS by Waldo Frank

SUMMER NEVER ENDS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Another modern story by Waldo Frank of people in conflict, doubt and quest, which, if you go for literary breastheaving, you may like. There is much convulsive emotion and deliberation, some passion, and a general aura of lavish lushness. It is the story of Mortimer Crane, fifty, wealthy, successful, who gave up labor and liberalism for the easy acquisition of money. Now about to be divorced by his brittle, mercenary wife, meeting indifference from his profligate son, and his daughter, Crane is left at loose (very) ends. He turns to Dagny, a young student, is much attracted by her, and finally succeeds in seducing her only on the condition that he will leave her alone in the future, and eventually Crane returns to his children to attempt to win them back. Presented with a good deal of obvious exertion.

Pub Date: Aug. 21st, 1941
Publisher: Duell Sloan & Pearce