THE DAY THE NUMBERS DISAPPEARED by
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THE DAY THE NUMBERS DISAPPEARED

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Here is the kind of arithmetic lesson plan that student teachers hunt for, try for, die for. It is cast as a story and able to be read that way--but it is a lesson plan. When Mr. Dibbs' class decides that arithmetic is a bore, he says that if they are able to forego numbers, he will teach no more math. They enthusiastically agree, but when they arrive next day to find a clock without hands, a TV without dial numbers, that they must recast their addresses as, ""the house next to the..."", and that their games are scoreless, they throw in the towel. Mr. Dibbs, a sporting winner, reteaches arithmetic-- with a difference. Returning them to the state of early man, without numbers, Mr. Dibbs brings his class up through the Egyptian, Roman, Arabic numerals to modern concepts in numbers and number placement. The illustrations by Jeanne Bendick are utilitarian (in this case, no derogatory term). It seems as though this would make an excellent remedial aid for the older reader who has to be seduced into math as well as a pattern for teachers.

Pub Date: Feb. 6th, 1963
Publisher: McGraw-Hill-Whittlesey House