HOW NOT TO WRITE A PLAY by Walter Kerr

HOW NOT TO WRITE A PLAY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

An inquiry into audience indifference places contemporary theater on the grill and investigates why it is unsuccessful in a firm and critical manner. Maintaining that modern theatre is basically unpopular, he shows the damage that Ibsen, Checkhov and Shaw have inflicted on today's writers; he bewails the ""calculated inertia"" and argues for a narrative with strong clashes to which the theatregoer may succumb; he reviews those recent plays which have been committed to stasis; he diagnoses the spark of life in others. There is much of Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller's work; the demands of the ""mass mind"" of the audience are given full consideration; the possibilities of themes and developments are investigated. Plenty of fighting words here but theatrical history today proves his points and serious drama followers will find much to stimulate them. Should be an excellent class and study group discussion book.

Pub Date: April 29th, 1955
Publisher: Simon & Schuster