THE PAST THAT WOULD NOT DIE by Walter Lord

THE PAST THAT WOULD NOT DIE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This is capable documentary coverage of the 1962 Old Miss riots, and as such an amplification of the headlines even though there have been a surfeit of titles on the inglorious South of the Sixties. The Lord name may be a positive factor particularly for a readership initially disinclined to read about this situation. Lord started with the Meredith case and then broadened his scope to include the entire state of Mississippi. He also goes back in time to the Civil War and Reconstruction eras, traces Mississippi's concerted and successful attempts to disenfranchise the newly accredited ""Negro citizen"", and gives the reasons for it. But the riots themselves are still the main reason for the book. The era of the Kennedys-- and in Mississippi, RFK played a crucial part-- and the 1964 Civil Rights legislation have not in themselves solved Mississippi's difficulties. The author indicates as major problems a nearly intransigent white populace, poverty, and the question mark of Negro education. Primarily a news document, but an essentially readable handling thereof.

Publisher: Harper & Row