THE MAN WITH THE MIRACLE CURE by Walter Ross

THE MAN WITH THE MIRACLE CURE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Walter Ross, whose The Immortal bore an unmistakable likeness to James (1958), now does a frozen section on what is again very recognizable- the rebiozen controversy which was recently, officially ended. Here Peter Doorn, an administrator and research scientist with not much clinical training and perhaps too much youthful hope, is approached by an older doctor, Coleman, and asked to give an open mind to a White Russian doctor, Stetunis, who claims to have a specific for . His antibiotic is Biogis, developed from sheep droppings in the Australian out-, and, as in the original case, he refuses to disclose its chemistry. Still Peter, attracted by its possibilities as well as Stetunis sister Irena who exerts startling chemical reaction herself, tries it out and the first subjective findings are promising. This encourages him to make an earlier statement than seems wise; faces organized medicine's boycott in the face of a tremendous public demand for the drug; but there are many failures to follow (it proves ineffectual on his own wife who shows up with a positive smear) and disappointments before Biogis is thoroughly discredited.... At best slick, this perhaps will have its strongest fascination for those who want to make the hook up with the obvious deadly parallel.

Pub Date: March 26th, 1964
Publisher: Simon & Schuster