PERSPECTIVES ON ECONOMIC GROWTH by Walter W.--Ed. Heller

PERSPECTIVES ON ECONOMIC GROWTH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The public has become growth-conscious, partly because of Soviet competition, partly because of the need for new jobs. These essays challenge the conventional wisdom by showing that economists don't always disagree, as well as by questioning the truism that economic growth means inflation and more balance of payments deficit. They are technical but quite general and suitable for college students or interested businessmen. George Perry and James Tobin discuss the justifications and implications of a national commitment to growth (which came in with JFK): Warren Smith claims that both stability and growth are possible with coordinated fiscal and monetary policies; Copper, Lampman, Bowen and Nelson deal with world leadership, welfare, ""human capital,"" and technology; Solow examines fixed investment and Okun analyzes the 1964 tax reduction. Recent developments make Smith and Perry most relevant; the latter cautions planners to go beyond national aggregates to the issues of how growth benefits are distributed, problems minimized, and social objectives sustained.

Pub Date: June 14th, 1968
Publisher: Random House