ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF ENERGY

A frustrating title in the ``Earth at Risk'' series. Though Brown offers a good deal of information about the generation of solar, wind, water, geothermal, and biomass power, he fails to make thoughtful comparisons of their cost, practicality, or relative environmental impact; and he claims, without comment, that ``Gravitational forces inside the planet create enormous heat below the surface,'' which will be news to those who postulate nuclear processes as the heat's cause. The b&w illustrations (mostly photos) are small, badly reproduced, technically deficient, and poorly linked to the text. List of organizational sources for further information; limited glossary; ``Further Reading'' (12 adult sources, all from the 80's), but no citations for the information in the text; index. (Nonfiction. 16+)

Pub Date: Aug. 27, 1993

ISBN: 0-7910-1588-2

Page Count: 112

Publisher: N/A

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1993

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JAM!

THE STORY OF JAZZ MUSIC

A busy page design—artily superimposed text and photos, tinted portraits, and break-out boxes—and occasionally infelicitous writing (“Trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie became . . . bandleader of the quintet at the Onyx Club, from which bebop got its name”) give this quick history of jazz a slapdash air, but Lee delves relatively deeply into the music’s direct and indirect African roots, then goes beyond the usual tedious tally of names to present a coherent picture of specific influences and innovations associated with the biggest names in jazz. A highly selective discography will give readers who want to become listeners a jump start; those seeking more background will want to follow this up with James Lincoln Collier’s Jazz (1997). (glossary, further reading, index) (Nonfiction. 9-11)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 1999

ISBN: 0-8239-1852-1

Page Count: 64

Publisher: N/A

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1999

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A grim but worthy read.

A CAVE IN THE CLOUDS

A YOUNG WOMAN'S ESCAPE FROM ISIS

This book chronicles the traumatic story of Ahmed, a young Ezidi woman who was abducted by Islamic State group forces from her village in northern Iraq and subsequently forced into sexual slavery.

Ahmed’s ordeal began at age 18, when IS’ army rolled into her native village of Kocho, thwarting her family’s attempt to seek refuge in the surrounding mountains. The village population was promptly split between the men, driven to an unknown fate, and the women and children, rounded up in a nearby school before being forced aboard trucks heading to neighboring Syria. Months of captivity in the most extreme conditions ensued before she was finally sold—alongside Navine, a friend met in captivity, and her nephew, Eivan, who she pretended was her son—to al-Amriki, an American citizen–turned-emir, a high-ranking position in IS’ military hierarchy. In a succession of fortunate circumstances and bold decisions, the trio managed to escape, first from the compound where they were held captive, and then from Syria toward a Turkish refugee camp. Ahmed, reunited with what was left of her family, attempted to heal her wounds and rebuild her life. The first-person narration provides important context for those unfamiliar with the Ezidi. Readers will find it hard not to empathize and be moved by Ahmed’s heart-wrenching ordeal and will likely forgive some of the book’s naïve essentialisms, plot holes, and unfortunate Eurocentrisms.

A grim but worthy read. (authors’ note, map, epilogue) (Nonfiction. 16-adult)

Pub Date: April 9, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-77321-235-7

Page Count: 248

Publisher: Annick Press

Review Posted Online: Dec. 19, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2019

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